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ARCHITECTURE AND PRESERVATION NEWS for the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee (ModCom) and other Mid Century Modern, Googie, International, Art Deco, 20th Century design

Moderators: I_LUV_POWER!!!!, Joe, Adriene, moderns-r-us, Tony, Futura Girl, sean, Josh Geidel, nichols, Java

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googieagog
Modern Master
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Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 8:43 am
Location: O'Hareville

new member

Postby googieagog » Sat Jan 17, 2004 10:10 am

Hello, I'm Dan. My wife Jill and I have collected '50s modern since 1983, and are doing our part to infect our two daughters as well. We're on our 2nd '50s house, a cottage designed and built in 1950 by the original owner, a tradesman inspired by Usonian and other modernist plans of the time. It's in a forgotten semi-rural pocket by O'Hare Airport outside Chicago (we're natives), with a 1950 Better Homes & Gardens concept house (now up for sale) down the street as well as a killer Keck & Keck and a nice Taliesen student home nearby. Our place was in tough shape but after 5 years of work it's coming along, with a long way yet to go. Flat roofs -- gotta love 'em but they're not easy in the Midwest. Our place is furnished with the usual Nelson, Eames & Noguci stuff, Heywood Wakefield and new IKEA built-ins customized to look something like McCobb. We just spent the holidays in Holland where we visited a stunning array of 20th Century architecture (lots of Amsterdam School, De Stijl, Dutch "New Building," postwar and structuralist) and art (COBRA movement and a whole forest of Barbara Hepworth sculptures). Anyway, I've been on the Jetsetmodern.com Chicago-based discussion group for the last five years. It's been fun but seems to be winding down now (Joe and Sandy have launched a great Webzine, though), so I thought I'd give this forum a try. The big news in Chicago is preservationists buying Mies' Farnsworth House, which is expected to open again for tours this spring. I look forward to chatting on vintage modern restoration and preservation, especially in the Chicago area, as well as rockabilly/tiki/lounge and '50s clothes, cars & culture.

modfan
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Do a search or wander thru the msg board

Postby modfan » Sun Jan 18, 2004 9:26 am

You'll find some posts on the Farnsworth house so those of us on the left coast are aware it was saved from destruction.
How do the flat roofs hold up in the severe climate-some other posters from that area, say there are some problems but not unsurmountable, I'm even surprised there are flat roofed residences in Anchorage Alaska.

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googieagog
Modern Master
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Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 8:43 am
Location: O'Hareville

flat roof

Postby googieagog » Mon Jan 19, 2004 10:35 am

Our roof had 2 big problems. First, it was covered using 1950 materials -- felt and tar. I'm guessing it leaked almost from the beginning. There was a lot of plaster damage, some structural damage and evidence of frequent past repairs all over the house. Neighbors say the original owner was up there every year slathering on more tar. There were 5 roofs, all of the same material, when we did a tear-off in 2001. Second problem was incorrect design where roofs at 2 different levels met. Water pooled there instead of running off. Both problems were addressed when we had a commercial roof put on. Very costly, but not a drop of leaking since.

The biggest problem I've seen with flat roofs in this area is the freeze-thaw cycle and formation of ice dams. "Flat" roofs are pitched a little to shed water somewhere. When that passage gets blocked by ice, you get pooling & leaks. That's what happened to us on new year's day 2001 -- the kitchen ceiling wound up on the kitchen floor.

A guy from Anchorage told me flat roofs are popular there, designed to accumulate snow for insulation. That's a good solution, as long as the structure and roof surface can take it. Some '30s Keck houses in the Midwest were designed to keep a pool of water on the roof for summer cooling. Great in theory, but they leaked & were quickly revised to shed water instead of collect it.

notmars
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Flat roofs in the Midwest

Postby notmars » Mon Jan 19, 2004 3:38 pm


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googieagog
Modern Master
Posts: 202
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 8:43 am
Location: O'Hareville

re flat roofs in midwest

Postby googieagog » Tue Jan 20, 2004 10:51 am


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L.A.kevin
Special Secret Modern Agent
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Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2003 12:58 pm
Location: Mt. Washington

Postby L.A.kevin » Tue Jan 20, 2004 10:53 am


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lavardera
Modern Master
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Location: merchantville, nj
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Postby lavardera » Tue Jan 20, 2004 6:21 pm

Greg
gregory la vardera architect
modern stock plans www.lamidesign.com/plans
design blogger www.materialicio.us

notmars
Modern Groupie
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EPDM Roofing for flat roofs

Postby notmars » Tue Jan 20, 2004 6:42 pm


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googieagog
Modern Master
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Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 8:43 am
Location: O'Hareville

flat roofs

Postby googieagog » Tue Jan 20, 2004 9:10 pm


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lavardera
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Postby lavardera » Thu Jan 22, 2004 6:14 pm

Notmars - I don't think heat sealing is the way for patching rubber - you use a contact cement and an unvulcanized patch, just like an inner tube.
Greg

gregory la vardera architect
modern stock plans www.lamidesign.com/plans
design blogger www.materialicio.us


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