Ennis-Brown House in Trouble

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Ennis-Brown House in Trouble

Postby davidk6 » Tue Jan 18, 2005 6:16 pm

From the Art Deco Society of LA:

Preservation Issues

Endangered Wright

Save the Ennis-Brown House

Many of you may be aware of the relationship between the ADSLA and Frank Lloyd Wright?s Ennis-Brown house. Built in 1924, the house is a mélange of Wright?s singular design sensibilities and more classical Art Deco elements installed by the Ennis family themselves. Last year, our organizations hosted a very successful joint program, and we were looking forward to many more in the future. Unfortunately, a series of recent events has put the house in a crisis state, just as we are poised to finally begin the long-awaited, multi-million dollar restoration of the Ennis-Brown house. The calamity is compounded by two crises: one structural, the other financial. Several months ago, we learned that the house requires emergency shoring before restoration can begin in order to be safe for visitors and employees. Unfortunately, until that is installed (in two-three months), the house must be closed to the public, depriving us of the single major stream of revenue remaining to us ? tours, events, and bookstore sales. This makes our financial situation catastrophic since operating funds are already extremely tight and we will have no incoming revenue to offset the continuing operating expenses. The house has very, very little time. The irony is that all this is occurring just as the Ennis-Brown house was about to finally be restored to its full glory; if we had even five or six months left, we could begin the restoration, and hopefully generate enough income through film rentals, events, and other sources to keep the house open as a preservation landmark and tourist destination. Unfortunately, with the house closed, we have none of those options. And precious few weeks in which to act.

As such, I am making a plea to people of good will; please help us. Those of you who have had the privilege of being inside the Ennis-Brown house know it is unforgettable. Sadly, the only way to insure others will have the pleasure of experiencing it is if we are able to both save it and ensure its continuation as a public building. If we can raise the operating funds for even a few more months, that will happen. While we usually are happy to accept donations of all kind, the bald truth is that right now we need funds. Any amount, great or small, is incredibly deeply appreciated. We are a 501©3 organization, and all donations are tax deductible. Donations should be made to the Trust for Preservation of Cultural Heritage (the organization which has operated the house for 24 years), and sent care of the Art Deco Society of Los Angeles to the ADSLA's post office box - P.O. Box 972, Los Angeles, CA 90078. Please write ?Ennis Brown? on the front of the envelope. Other inquiries and suggestions are, of course, also appreciated and can be sent to me via e-mail at the address below. We hope to be able to see many of you at the Ennis-Brown house in the future.

We humbly thank you for support in our hour of great need.

Scott Frank

President, Board of Directors

Trust for Preservation of Cultural Heritage

(The Ennis-Brown House)

scottdfrank@yahoo.com

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Ennis-Brown

Postby SDR » Tue Jan 18, 2005 8:40 pm

Oh dear. Does anyone know Laura Bush? Maybe she can be pursueded to donate her Inaugural Oscar de la Renta so that it could be auctioned?

Arnold and Maria? Bill Gates? Lord and Lady Palumbo?

For those not familiar with it, this is the largest and most dramatically-sited of the four LA-area "textile block" houses. It is quite unique among Wright's work, a dramatic and romantic response to the clients and to its ridge-top location.

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Postby davidk6 » Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:56 pm

It's also the only one that has recently been open for tours.

Does anyone have any insight into when the Hollyhock House will be open again?

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Postby deanna b » Tue Jan 18, 2005 11:35 pm

I'll forward this to some of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer fan boards, since Ennis-Brown was used in Seasons 2&3 as Angel's "Crawford Street Mansion," so it would become a case of "Save Angel's House!"

And, let's see, Blade Runner, Rocketeer, the original House on Haunted Hill, etc.

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from a previous post...

Postby modfan » Wed Jan 19, 2005 7:45 am

Oh dear. Does anyone know Laura Bush? Maybe she can be pursueded to donate her Inaugural Oscar de la Renta so that it could be auctioned?

Arnold and Maria? Bill Gates? Lord and Lady Palumbo?


Where the heck is Barbra S. or Paris H.-seems they are noticeably not paying attention to this! Or all those overpriced 'gift bags' at media awards shows-they could be auctioned off on ebay for a worthy charitable event such as this!!!!

And WHERE IS Arnold and Maria when they are needed!

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Postby SDR » Wed Jan 19, 2005 10:52 am

David -- Somewhere in my web travels very recently I came across a notice regarding Hollyhock House: Docent trainees are being sought for the anticipated re-opening. Guess one would have to contact Olive Hill directly to learn more?

What's the status of the Freeman House? Millard ('LaMiniatura') is presumably in good hands; it was featured on the cover of Architectural Disgust (Digest) several years back, somewhat "antiqued" in paint and furnishings but not irreversibly so. . .and I'm sure I'm not alone in my eternal gratitude to Mr Silver for his sensitive and thorough restoration of my favorite, the Storer House.

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Postby davidk6 » Wed Jan 19, 2005 1:03 pm

According to its web site, the Hollyhock House has only exterior tours and is looking for docents for these tours. I've e-mailed the director to ask if there's any word yet on interior tours.

According to USC's web site for the Freeman House, which appears not to have changed in years and years, the house is (yes) being restored AND not being restored pending availability of funding.

I don't know anything about the Storer House; please fil us in.

As to the Millard House, I've seen the article and would love to get in. I have a dual interest as I'm interested in both architectural history and in the world of rare books. Alice Milard, for whom the house was designed and built, was a very prominent dealer in rare books and art. She was a prominent member of the LA book colecting/rare book scence of the 1920's and 1930's -- as well as having connections to the Chicago of Eugene Field and another group of publishers and bibliophiles.

Any ideas on getting an invitation from the owners?

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Dave

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Postby davidk6 » Wed Jan 19, 2005 1:11 pm

...and my post to the director at the Barnsdall Art Park/Holyhock House bounced: user unknown.
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Postby davidk6 » Wed Jan 19, 2005 1:14 pm

...and a phone call got "possibly in the spring; problems keep cropping up; restoration is underway as we speak," ... which is just about what I got a year ago. It's always "in the spring."
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Postby SDR » Wed Jan 19, 2005 2:02 pm

The house for Dr John Storer was built in 1923-4, on a hillside site at a bend on Hollywood Boulevard, not far west of Laurel Canyon Boulevard. It was the second of the four "textile block" houses Wright designed and built between 1923 and 1926. Construction suervision was by Lloyd Wright (Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr). It was purchased by film producer Joel Silver ("Predator," "Lethal Weapon," "Die Hard") and restored in 1984-86, with the help of architect Eric Lloyd Wright, Lloyd Wright's son. Original design elements, some never completed, were added, including colorful roof-terrace awnings. (In 1986 Silver bought "Auldbrass," the Leigh Stevens plantation complex Wright built in the lowlands of Yemassee, South Carolina, beginning in 1938; this too has been impressively restored and completed, to a standard not often encountered in such projects.)

The Storer House is based on a design of 1922, for C P Lowes, in Eagle Rock, which was not built. The plan includes two living floors of identical shape, the lower (entry) level for dining, the upper as a living room with a high ceiling, both lighted from two sides with tall windows divided by columns of textured block with a knee-high "guard rail," both served by an asymmetrical side-facing chimney at one end of the space. The house is a "split-level" structure; two levels of cozy bedrooms occur at the half-level, served by a stair system at the chimney end of the main block. Wood floors and heavy ceiling beams (with the first, tentative use of textile block as a ceiling finish, in the living room) provide an almost medieval feel and a welcome contrast to the predominance of "busy," rough-textured concrete block.

SDR :cheers:

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Postby nichols » Wed Jan 19, 2005 4:17 pm

Storer house

Image

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Postby SDR » Thu Jan 20, 2005 12:58 pm

"As the house neared completion, Lloyd expressed concern about the result. His father responded [by telegram, from Taliesin-?]. . .that 'color would help the Storer house -- the awnings especially should go on at once. Color if judiciously applied to the piers would help a lot. I think what you say is probably true as to its lacking joy. We'll see however before we finish'" [quoted from "Wright in Hollywood" by Robert L Sweeney. p62]. The awnings were designed by Lloyd and were installed shortly thereafter. "Although he moved in, the house was placed on the market shortly after completion and was sold in 1927. The first documented impression we find of the house, other than that provided by the Wrights, came in 1931 from Pauline Schindler, by then separated from her husband and renting it." She found it 'superb' and wrote that it gave her 'superlative joy.'" Sweeney calls it "part temple and part grotto" and particularly admires the sweeping city views from its upper level living room (a favorite and lifelong Wrightian device; see discussion of the theory of "prospect and refuge" in Grant Hildebrand, "The Wright Space"). Mr Silver's furnishings, as photographed, certainly provide appropriate color and warmth to the interior.

R M Schindler built a house for Charles P Lowes on his lot at Eagle Rock (near Pasadena) in the same year. It shared with Wright's plan a central ground-floor dining room open to terraces on both sides. Pauline invited Schindler to see the Storer house and there was talk of his designing furnishings for it, as he later did for the Freeman's textile block house.

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Postby SDR » Thu Jan 20, 2005 5:24 pm

Anyway, the point of this thread is the threat to the Ennis-Brown House, and efforts to raise awareness and urgently-needed funds for its rescue and restoration. The great retaining wall, which provides the house with its visual (if not literal) foundation, has been a problem area from the time of construction. Lloyd Wright, again supervising construction for his father, reported six months after construction commenced that there was cracking, bulging and popping of blocks in parts of the wall, whose construction consisted of the block surface, connected to perpendicular crib-walls at 8-foot intervals, tied to the hill with horizontal concrete beams, the whole back-filled with "soil or sand" (Sweeney). I am not clear on what steps were taken, then or later, to remedy the defect; Wright told Lloyd ". . .cracks nor bulge of no great significance."

Later difficulties with the architecture were of a more cosmetic nature, though no less distressing to the architects, father and son. The clients, possibly attempting to save costs, lowered ceilings and made them flat instead of coffered, and substituted window-head lintels for the stepped-block designs specified. In addition (according to Sweeney): massing and block patterning were modified; the front door was moved 12 feet (from the termination of an open loggia to its outer end); white marble replaced the shale flooring intended for the entry and loggia; a low wall separating dining from living room was lowered by one course and a glass screen intended there was eliminated; "Wrightian" leaded-glass windows of uncertain parentage, instead of Wright's simpler rectangular design (coordinated with the block pattern), were installed, as was wrought-iron work and chandeliers foreign to the architecture of the house. Bathrooms were tiled, rather than being block-walled (and ceilinged). Wright apparently designed no furniture for the Ennises (other than some unexecuted wall lamps).

30 years later, Wright commented that the house was too big, "way out of concrete block size. . .out of bounds." But, with the unauthorized changes that were made during construction, he may have been less than enthusiastic about his last Los Angeles block house.

What was most significant, and unique, about the house, survives: a particularly strong evocation of Mayan monumentality, and a ceremonial quality to the interior, which is centered on its large, raised dining room, with its own fireplace and major view of the city. The entire sequence of arrival, a winding road from below to the massive gate, into a motor court like an "outdoor room" surounded by a low wall and with an impressive view, then through the entrance into a typically-Wrightian low and dark hall, finally up some stairs and into the light and space of the high-ceilinged dining room and smaller, lower living room, both served by a collonaded loggia which contains the living room fireplace. The house has "the most abstract spaces of any block house," according to Mr Sweeney, and "the Ennises seem to have understood the religious iconography of their house, turning to Mayan sources for decorative inspiration. Ceremony using fire plays a role in almost every religion; the Ennises acknowledged this in commissioning the bronze hood for the fireplace, which depicts Xiuheuctli, the ancient Mayan god of fire."

SDR

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Postby SDR » Thu Jan 20, 2005 5:54 pm

David -- Can you tell us where, specifically, is shoring needed?

I am looking for coverage I have seen, about the major structural intervention that was undertaken at Fallingwater a couple of years ago -- it was quite an interesting technical feat, and saved this priceless treasure from an "early retirement."

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Postby davidk6 » Thu Jan 20, 2005 7:24 pm

SDR wrote:David -- Can you tell us where, specifically, is shoring needed?

I am looking for coverage I have seen, about the major structural intervention that was undertaken at Fallingwater a couple of years ago -- it was quite an interesting technical feat, and saved this priceless treasure from an "early retirement."



A nice bit of information about the restoration of Falingwater can be found at

http://www.wpconline.org/fallingwater/r ... /main.html

More can be found by following links from there and by googling

Falingwater shoring

OR

Fallingwater restoration.


The information I posted about the Ennis-Brown House came from the ADSLA web site. Contacting them may lead to additional information.

Regards
Dave

PS The 8th Congress of the Intergalactic Art Deco Society will be held in NYC in May. If anyone is interested, I'll post information as I get it.

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Postby nichols » Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:12 am

A neat way to contribute to the well being of the Ennis-Brown house is through their "Adopt-a-block" program:

http://www.ennisbrownhouse.org/adopt-a- ... block.html

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Postby Vavala » Tue Mar 01, 2005 11:53 am

Los Angeles Times
March 1, 2005

Warning: Hills Can Slide, Even on the Sunniest Days

· A Wright landmark and other homes are red-tagged. Key route is closed. More trouble is likely.

By Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer

A hill collapse closed Laurel Canyon Boulevard and ground instability prompted the city to red-tag Frank Lloyd Wright's landmark Ennis-Brown House as mudslides continued to trigger evacuations Monday despite five days of dry weather.

Geologists said the mudslide danger could last for several months, even if little more rain falls. Water that has saturated hillsides this winter is sinking deeper into the ground, creating the potential for soil shifts that could trigger more collapses.

They pointed out that the 1995 mudslide in the La Conchita community in Ventura County that destroyed several homes occurred two months after the rains had stopped.

"The sun is shining, but the rain is busily percolating downward," said Randy Jibson, a geological consultant for the U.S. Geological Survey.

"You can't see it, but it's busy. I expect that in the next few months, we will see a spectrum of landslides — deeper, slow-moving landslides — throughout the region. They don't kill people, but they cause enormous property damage. You can sit there and listen to a house creaking and groaning, and you're helpless," he said.

Southern California has been battered by a series of heavy rainstorms that dumped more than 33.8 inches of rain so far this season, making it one of the wettest on record. Some meteorologists expect the 2004-05 season to eventually top the wettest on record, 1883-84, when 38.18 inches fell.

Officials on Monday were trying to determine the extent of the damage to the Wright creation, a massive concrete compound perched in the hills of Los Feliz just below the Griffith Observatory.

The house has had structural problems in the past, and there were signs Monday that portions of the massive Maya-inspired retaining wall were weakened by the rains. Several other homes in the area also have been red-tagged.

Los Angeles building inspectors determined the Ennis-Brown House was uninhabitable Saturday when they discovered that part of the wall behind the house was crumbling, said Bob Steinbach, a spokesman for the city's Department of Building and Safety.

Inspectors estimated that rain and mud have caused at least $500,000 damage to the house so far, he said.

The problems come as the Trust for Preservation of Cultural Heritage, a nonprofit, was embarking on a major effort to restore the compound, which has been deteriorating because of age as well as several nature diasters, including the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

The nearly 10,000-square-foot home is made of more than 24,000 patterned, perforated and smooth concrete blocks that contain decomposed granite extracted from the site.

A few miles to the west, a hill gave way at the entrance to Laurel Canyon Boulevard near Mount Olympus Drive, causing the city to close a key route between the San Fernando Valley and the Westside and to evacuate several houses along Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Commuters had to find other routes through the Hollywood Hills.

Officials said three houses were red-tagged, meaning no one was allowed in, and three were yellowed-tagged, meaning residents had only limited access.

As of Monday, more than 80 residences had been red-tagged in Los Angeles alone. Several other hillside communities have also reported severe damage to residences, including Culver City, Pasadena, Glendale, Anaheim and Laguna Beach.

Four houses in the Phillips Ranch section of Pomona were red-tagged last week after the slope below them began to give way and the structures started crumbling.

In Diamond Bar, a hillside slid a quarter-mile, carrying trees and debris into the backyards of neighboring houses. City officials said many of them were built before the city incorporated in 1989, before more stringent standards were in place.

Mudslides are caused by oversaturated ground that is absorbing water deeper and deeper, creating a powerful force beneath the surface that can carry cars, houses and people away.

Geologists expect to see this pattern continue at least through May.

"Failures can happen months after rains because of the permeability and the slope and other related things," said Doug Morton, a retired geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey.

The passage of time after a rainstorm reduces the chances that a slide will occur, Jibson said, but if one does happen, it is likely to be relatively large.

"The deeper the water has infiltrated the ground, the deeper the slides," he said. "But it's been longer, so it's less likely it will happen."

Generally, 10 inches of rain marks the point at which mudslides start occurring in Southern California, Jibson said. Because rain started to fall earlier than usual this season — October instead of November — water absorption was accelerated.

"We're not out of the woods yet in La Conchita and similar places," Jibson said, referring to the community where a massive mudslide in January killed 10 people. "We could very well in the next few weeks or months see deeper landslides in other parts of the neighborhood."

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Postby bananabobs » Tue Mar 01, 2005 10:22 pm

I just saw pictures on the news of what I assume is the wall that needs to be shored, crumbled down. I think it’s a dang shame. When I signed on just now this thread is up at the top, I read the first post and frankly it got me mad. (Caution, flame ahead) Let me back up for a second, my daughter e-mailed me a picture of the Eames house in Pacific Palisades, I had never seen this before and I followed the link in. There is a notice that you may call ahead, reserve a time and then with no parking available, you may walk to the outside, take no pictures, don't look in any windows, no body is allowed into the studio and to top it off it will cost you. I will not tour this property and I am nuts about this stuff. I am pissed and I only read the web site, who would want to do that? Not a "regular" person. I am doing a remodel in Monte Nido and the other day I decided to run up the hill and see what’s cooking at Eric Wrights place, big sign on the gate, you must call ahead, no visitors, frankly your not welcome. Now up to speed, Scott Frank says that they need money to restore the Ennis-Brown House so THEY can restore it as it needs shoring and is unsafe for the public or employees, and now the wall is down and its splashed all over the news besmirching the Wright name. Here is my anger, I am a Builder/Contractor and there are other builders out there who would have jumped all over our selves to have equipment and materials there to stop this. Many on this board would have showed up to do anything that they could. But in better times there is a committee and a society and a P.O. box to send a donation, but don't take any freaking pictures and by God call ahead. Sorry for the rant. Am I off track here? (Don't even get me started on what it costs to see live classical music)

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Postby nichols » Tue Mar 01, 2005 11:55 pm

I'm sorry you feel that way, BB, but those are all privately owned homes and I for one am ecstatic that they are -ever- open. You should have attended the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee 20/20/20 tour in September. Through the generosity of the Eames Office we had great access to the Eames Case Study house all day and pictures galore: http://www.lottaliving.com/gallery/even ... _tourgoers

You also have to give the Eames family a great deal of credit for hanging on to a 3 or 4 or 5 million dollar property and leaving it just as Charles and Ray left it. There is no income from that house and nobody lives there. It's a private museum maintained, run and paid for by the family.

The Ennis-Brown situation is quite a bit trickier. Gus Brown owned the house outright, it was his primary residence. Decades ago he started a foundation and donated the house to it. He was the director and elected to continue living in the house as he always had. He passed away recently and the foundation acquired the property in whole... and then it rained and rained and the house nearly washed away. It has decades of deferred maintenance that they still can't afford to pay for. Tours were their primary source of income and those have stopped.

I don't mean to sound rude, but you can't just go into a museum and ask to feel the texture of the paintings, you can't try on the suit of armor or drink from the Pre-Columbian bowls.

It's amazing that anybody appreciates the architecture of their house so much that they allow dozens or hundreds of strangers to tromp through on a regular basis...

The number of historic Modern homes (any kind of home) officially owned by museums or foundations in Southern California is tiny. USC does an incredible job with the Gamble House, The MAK Center from Austria bought the Schindler house and it's open for regular tours. Aline Barnsdall willed her FLW Hollyhock house to the City of LA and it is undergoing restoration to open next year , Wright's Freeman house was donated to USC and languished for years and the Neutra VDL house is owned by Cal Poly Pomona, who is having trouble fundraising for it's restoration... There aren't a lot of success stories out there.

Running any kind of a house museum is obviously a lot of work and there isn't a lot of funding out there for this kind of thing... I'm not saying the Ennis-Brown foundation has always been run in the best way, but it's incredible that Mr. Brown donated his multi-million dollar estate and it's even more amazing that it's still standing.

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Postby L.A.kevin » Wed Mar 02, 2005 9:10 am

Hey BB,

If you are serious about wanting to help, why not offer your services to whatever structure you'd like to preserve. I volunteer over at the Neutra VDL research house, and during the last rains, I was over there 3 times a day doing flood abatement. I think a lot of the trusts for these structures are hampered by the fact that they are run by people that aren't good enough with their hands or don't the have technical knowledge to fix the problems that pop up. What's more, they don't know how to ask for help from those that do. They know how to get grants and form committees, but it just doesn't occur to a lot of them for ask for technical volunteers.

Offer your services... I've done that and it's rewarding helping to preserve a structure. I wish I could do more work at Neutra's house, but with school and work, it's really hard to find the time- I'm just trying to pass thermodynamics.

Maybe a new technical volunteer wing of the Modcom could be formed? Money is one thing, but I'm sure a lot of places could just use help with replacing stucco, caulking windows, patching roofs. Seems like a lot of skilled people could be doing that work and saving these foundations hundreds of thousands.

Kevin

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Postby SDR » Wed Mar 02, 2005 11:23 am

Really good idea, Kevin! Hope this will be taken to heart by some who could make a difference -- perhaps others will be able to report of successful efforts along these lines, elsewhere. . .?

I'm hoping I am correct in believing that the long-standing and worsening (?) troubles with the "retaining wall" at the Ennis-Brown House are essentially cosmetic, and do not affect the structural integrity of the house above. This is based on my understanding that the structure of that wall consists of the row of canted concrete piers ("crib-walls") mentioned in the post above, to which the textile-block "tiles" were applied. It was the subsequent (perhaps unnecessary?) back-filling behind this surface which began settling and disturbing those tiles, six months after the beginning of construction (according to Sweeney).

If this is so, as long as the crib-walls are not moving, the problem is one of correcting the back-fill issue and replacing broken or missing face tiles.

Can anyone confirm or correct this understanding of the affair?

SDR

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Postby bananabobs » Wed Mar 02, 2005 2:57 pm

"I don't mean to sound rude, but you can't just go into a museum and ask to feel the texture of the paintings, you can't try on the suit of armor or drink from the Pre-Columbian bowls."

Rude? Sheesh, you are down right polite, thank you very much,
Well I agree but...if the place is going under and may be ruined, what the heck!

All your points are well taken, I have and will offer my services to preserve historical buildings and properties.
I wish I had attended the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee 20/20/20 tour in September I would love to see the inside, thats one reason I hang out here to be part of those activities.

Maybe a new technical volunteer wing of the Modcom could be formed? Money is one thing, but I'm sure a lot of places could just use help with replacing stucco, caulking windows, patching roofs. Seems like a lot of skilled people could be doing that work and saving these foundations hundreds of thousands.


My point exactly. Thank you very much.

The number of historic Modern homes (any kind of home) officially owned by museums or foundations in Southern California is tiny


And there should be enough people interested in helping out that none of these properties should be in trouble. So whats the hang up?

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Postby davidk6 » Wed Mar 02, 2005 3:26 pm

SDR wrote:I'm hoping I am correct in believing that the long-standing and worsening (?) troubles with the "retaining wall" at the Ennis-Brown House are essentially cosmetic, and do not affect the structural integrity of the house above. ...
If this is so, as long as the crib-walls are not moving, the problem is one of correcting the back-fill issue and replacing broken or missing face tiles.

Can anyone confirm or correct this understanding of the affair?

SDR


What exactly does "red tagging" mean? Is it decided by people who understand structural engineering or by people who see that something looks wrong from a lay point of view?

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Postby SDR » Wed Mar 02, 2005 3:48 pm

Sadly, the number of people in any human society who have a serious interest in architecture will always be small; only a portion of those are Modern fans. For most, a building will only be an expected convenience or an unremarkable feature of the urban, suburban or rural landscape. The number of buildings designed by architects is only a fraction of the total built each year, and the percentage of those architects who are artists is smaller still.

Red-tagging is done by professional building inspectors on behalf of local government, which is charged by statute with protecting the public safety. Buildings are yellow-tagged (in some locales), allowing owners or residents limited access, or red-tagged to indicate a judgement of uninhabitability and/or potential hazard to neighboring property.

SDR

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bananabobs
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Postby bananabobs » Wed Mar 02, 2005 8:22 pm

SDR wrote: The number of buildings designed by architects is only a fraction of the total built each year, and the percentage of those architects who are artists is smaller still.
SDR


Herein lies another conundrum; architects that design buildable, safe buildings, staying artists.

Reminds me of our unoffical motto, Good, Cheap, Fast, pick two.

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Postby SDR » Wed Mar 02, 2005 8:39 pm

Exactly. The exception to the "rule" that good arhitecture will be expensive has been broken occasionally; some of our favorite MCM houses were examples of the exceptions to that rule, when they were new. There are those who wish to demonstrate that the rule can still be broken, today. Factory prefabrication of components continues to offer the promise of good building, reasonably priced; such homes will continue to demonstrate rational design at its most practical and attractive, as they did sixty years ago.

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Postby bananabobs » Wed Mar 02, 2005 8:48 pm

I had to wipe away a tear before I responded, I am all about factory built housing, it is right for so many reasons! I found this company an am looking to place one on a property I own in Ohio this year.
http://rocioromero.com/home.htm
Fixed the link, sorry!
Last edited by bananabobs on Thu Mar 03, 2005 6:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Futura Girl » Thu Mar 03, 2005 3:40 am

The house was featured on NPR today:
read the story here...

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... Id=4520645

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I think there might

Postby modfan » Thu Mar 03, 2005 7:57 am

be a misconception.

A lot of stories on this mention that the house was used in Blade Runner-
as Decker's apartment. But I recall reading on another website about the movie that it was all constructed on a stage set and they didn't film there although the 'theme' decoration of the apartment would suggest Wright's textile block houses.

Hey lurking rich folks ya gotta have $12 million around to save this-Paris Hilton do something constructive with your wealth for once!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Postby SDR » Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:49 am

[I've had the same question about the (apparent) use of interiors at the Gamble House, in the first "Back To The Future" movie. My jaw dropped when I saw what appeared to be the garage interior in use as the doctor's (?) office/lab. . .never read anything about it, one way or the other. . .did they only use the exterior, and recreate in the studio? Anybody know?]

I'm hoping someone can answer the question posed above about actual structural damage at the Ennis-Brown House. Or is it too soon to know?

SDR
Last edited by SDR on Fri Mar 18, 2005 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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