To build or buy, a difficult question

Home improvement Q&A, pictures and news fro Mid Century Modern Homes and Houses(NOT for Real Estate)

Moderators: I_LUV_POWER!!!!, Joe, Adriene, moderns-r-us, Tony, Futura Girl, nichols, Java

tallrick
Modern Socialite
Posts: 66
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 9:19 pm
Location: Key Largo Florida

To build or buy, a difficult question

Postby tallrick » Sun Oct 28, 2007 9:11 pm

Still trying to decide here. My current home is fine, but I am being taxed out of existance, and have no room to grow. Will be doing a "fix up" and update to make it more sellable, but want to move. The ideal home for me would be on at least 2 acres, preferably more, and will have no more than a 1500.00 per year property tax bill. Reinforced concrete or steel deck roof, flat. Single or two-level, preferably one story with plenty of natural vegetation surrounding. I already have a suitable piece of land upstate and will build my home if the property tax situation is resolved. Yet I always wondered, is it possible to find an affordable, modern home like this anyplace besides overpriced regions where the land value exceeds that of the home? Since most homes are built with wood, I have been convinced that only a new build would satisfy my needs. Yes as a last resort I could settle for a wood roof only if it was flat and built with heavy, exposed beams but in my mind wood is not the ideal modern material. I have built my own home and would do it again. My estimate is that the 1500 square foot house I designed would be built for less than 40,000 doing most of it myself., and take about a year. I can do anything from form work to electrical and plumbing, so the only labor I would use is to place concrete or set blocks. I would use only 50's appliances and hardware, as I did here. If I stay in Florida my home will be courtyard style, with ribbon windows on outer walls and floor to ceiling windows to the enclosed courtyard.
Make modern your own, don't trust others to- it's our future.

deagna
Modern Socialite
Posts: 41
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 8:14 am
Location: Prairie Village, Kansas
Contact:

Postby deagna » Mon Nov 12, 2007 9:54 am

I think if you can get more for your money by building new, I would encourage you to do it. You won't have to make compromises in the design or location. I own a 1300 sf Cliff May in the midwest, though in a well-developed area (as most suburban developments are) and my property taxes are no lower than yours, so I doubt you'll be able to find what you want unless you purchase a custom designed home that was built out of city boundaries.

You can go rural in that case or to build your own home to avoid these higher taxes, but you must remember all of the conveniences that come with taxes: city water, proximity to law enforcement, fire department, hospitals and as my mother-in-law is quick to point out: internet access.

jakabedy
Modern Master
Posts: 313
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:52 pm
Location: Birmingham, AL

Postby jakabedy » Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:17 pm

I think deagna hit it on the head. Typically, lower property taxes = further from town. And in a grander sense, lower property taxes = a less progressive state/area. There are always trade-offs.

We have essentially what you are looking for, absent the concrete construction preferences. 2000 square feet, MCM architecture, on three wooded acres. We also have very low property taxes courtesy of being in an unincorporated area in the state of Alabama. Of course, the downside is . . . we're in an unincorporated area in the state of Alabama. But this is where our work is, where our lives are. It is where we want to be. I don't know that it would necessarily be the place for someone relocating from a much more fast-paced, progressive city or area. Purchase price: 215K. Taxes on a 179K tax value: $700 per year.

Image
Image
1920s Bungalow Gal turned MCM Maven

My Blog: http://magiccitymodern.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Joe
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 4624
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:10 am
Location: sunny Eugene, Oregon
Contact:

Postby Joe » Mon Nov 12, 2007 3:22 pm


User avatar
Stephen
Modern Guru
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 8:35 am
Location: Tustin, CA
Contact:

Postby Stephen » Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:39 pm

Stephen Meade
SoCal Realtor - DRE 01378749
Pacific West Assoc. of Realtors President-Elect
http://www.OCModHomes.com
http://www.CliffMaySocal.com
and
Cliff May Homeowner

Bosa Nova
Modern Fan
Posts: 20
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 4:06 pm
Location: florida

Postby Bosa Nova » Tue Nov 13, 2007 6:43 pm

I was priced out of Key West a couple of years ago by the insurance companies; and so, I have experienced your dilemma.

I moved to Gainesville and love it here; however, the property tax in Alachua County is atrocious and the city takes a big bite as well. On the positive side I live in wonderful college town that has art, entertainment and divergent cultures and view points. I was not willing to sacrifice those luxuries in my life: Yet. Additionally, I am basically two hours drive from nearly everything. It is an odd feeling after living at the end of the road for so long.

I took over a year to find my neighborhood. We have similar shopping lists. I drove real estate agents nuts. They could not grasp my simple but many specific needs. It turns out there are really only three or four such neighborhoods in town, but they just could not process the details. I drove up many times and spent hours checking each neighborhood.

I would suggest buying land in a county north of Clearwater in an unincorporated area. The prices and taxes are low. So buy a big piece of property with a future eye to subdividing and selling off small parcels as the market increases, or simply insuring yourself a buffer zone. I am sure you will eventually need it. Pasco County will see substantial development within the next 20 years which will help to increase your value over time.

I too wanted a small home on a large parcel. It makes us very odd. While I understand you are building for yourself I think bumping up your square footage a little will greatly increase your future resale value. I don’t mean ridiculous footage but 1500sf is going to deter a great many potential future buyers.

I could blather on but this seems a good start.

Just my 2 cents.

tallrick
Modern Socialite
Posts: 66
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 9:19 pm
Location: Key Largo Florida

Postby tallrick » Wed Nov 14, 2007 9:36 pm

Make modern your own, don't trust others to- it's our future.

User avatar
Futura Girl
Lotta Living Hostess
Lotta Living Hostess
Posts: 4161
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:54 pm
Location: Las VEGAS babay!
Contact:

Postby Futura Girl » Fri Nov 16, 2007 5:56 am


User avatar
rockland
Mondo Lounge Lizard
Posts: 1504
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 8:45 am
Location: wesley hills,NY

Postby rockland » Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:38 am


fuegos100
Modern Fan
Posts: 29
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2005 4:54 pm
Location: austin
Contact:

prop taxes-ouch

Postby fuegos100 » Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:13 am

we have no income taxes in tx

so property taxes are high. with RE prices going up steeply many folks are finding it hard to keep their home that was once cheap and on the edge of the city. with growth many of those neighborhoods that were once far are now considered central.

I think we're paying 15k or more in prop taxes a year.

now that I am moved in and homestead I do have a cap they can apprciate me. but last year they doubled the value of my dirt! most of my neighbors pay more than 20k a yr in prop taxes.

it's gonna be tough to keep this home.

User avatar
Jerad
Modern Master
Posts: 165
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2006 3:15 pm
Location: Prairie Village, KS
Contact:

Postby Jerad » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:41 pm

I'm right down the street from deagna and I would consider our area in the midwest as reasonable. After my rehab, I will probably be looking to build new sometime in the next few years. I was really curious when you mentioned your 1500 sq.ft. home for 40k. I was hoping you missed a 0 in your number :D I did that math and thats 27 bucks a square foot. If you can build a new house for that go for it.

Jerad
www.drummondhome.blogspot.com

jakabedy
Modern Master
Posts: 313
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 6:52 pm
Location: Birmingham, AL

Postby jakabedy » Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:08 am

$27 a square foot would indeed be quite an achievement. I'm guessing tallrick has the capacity to do a lot of the construction himself.

As for our skylight, our analysis paralysis took care of the problem. Once fall came, the heat off the skylight became a non-issue. We'll revisit it again in the spring. One thing we did realize though, is that it doesn't seem so hot when you're not in the house :) . With the move this summer and DH having time off between jobs, we were there a lot during the day. Going forward, we won't be there as much during the peak baking hours (12-3pm).
1920s Bungalow Gal turned MCM Maven



My Blog: http://magiccitymodern.blogspot.com/

User avatar
googieagog
Modern Master
Posts: 202
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 8:43 am
Location: O'Hareville

Postby googieagog » Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:39 am

This discussion of taxes, location and govt. services is interesting. Proximity to a major metro area isn't always the determining factor. We're 30 minutes from downtown Chicago, yet we're in an isolated unincorporated neighborhood. Downsides: well & septic, no fire hydrants, no high-speed internet, no restaurant delivery (they can't find us), long county police response times, and we must drive to stores, dining, kids' playdates etc. Upsides: no pesky building code enforcement, lots of open land, lots of critters, no sidewalks, no streetlights, no teardowns (well & septic scares McMansion developers) good schools and low property taxes compared to neighboring towns. The positives usually outweigh the negatives -- but not always.

Jakabedy, what a stunning house! Here's a skylight glare solution I've seen in other MCM houses: Matchstick or bamboo blinds installed in the horizontal plane, which sit on top of a couple strands of picture wire strung on small eyehooks. The blinds' operating cords are strung along the ceiling, also using eyehooks, to the nearest wall.

tallrick
Modern Socialite
Posts: 66
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 9:19 pm
Location: Key Largo Florida

Postby tallrick » Sun Nov 25, 2007 8:28 pm

You would be amazed, but I built my current home in 1990 for 25K. It's all concrete, roof and all. I did it by not buying anything except rebar, blocks, concrete pipe and wire. My dad and I did most of it, only hiring labor to help place concrete. Everything else was salvaged or built by me. I would gladly do the same in a place with a lot more land and a lot less regulations. My goal for the next home is close to total self-sufficiency.
Make modern your own, don't trust others to- it's our future.


Return to “Mid Century Modern Houses and Homes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AHrefsBot and 7 guests