mid-mod driveway gate - seeking photos for inspiration

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jakabedy
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mid-mod driveway gate - seeking photos for inspiration

Postby jakabedy » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:15 am

Here I sit, in the land of fluted columns and magnolias, facing a quest for a mid-mod appropriate driveway gate. The workings of the gate itself (sliding, double, single, etc.) are quite universal. But I'm looking for ideas for the gate itself and for the masonry post(s) I'd like to add. It will probably be a sliding gate, based on the incline of the driveway. The main purpose of the gate is to hold in the dogs, so can't be too "airy" in design, unfortunately.

The house isn't seen from the street, and the driveway opening is essentially a break in the woods. But I'd like to extend the MCM footprint to the road, so to speak. I do have a large amount of matching original brick (see photo below), which I would like to use in some way. The mailbox will not be integrated into the post, based on the setback needs of the gate. I will have to run power down there, so would like to add some light, as well.

Simple, no?

I thought some of you may have some photos, or some of you west coast folks may know of gate vendor websites in your area that may have photos.

Thanks much!


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tallrick
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Postby tallrick » Thu Jan 24, 2008 6:44 am

I was thinking of the same thing when I was going to build a home in rural Florida. The gate I wanted to build was a one-piece rolling gate with concrete piers and flagcrete plaster to imitate what I was going to put on the house. To get a true 50's feel I was going to make a frame from 3 inch steel channel and use 2 inch angle iron for the cross pieces. Stylized palm trees and a flamingo would be added for interest. Think of Elvis' graceland gates and how they use open, airy steel and designs in a traditional, hinged gate design. Hopefully the real estate bubble hurries up and crashes so I can complete the home I wanted to build, and share pics.
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SDR
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Postby SDR » Thu Jan 24, 2008 12:30 pm

"I laugh in the face of danger! Then I hide until it goes away." Bender

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Postby Joe » Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:54 am


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Postby SDR » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:23 am

"I laugh in the face of danger! Then I hide until it goes away." Bender

egads
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Postby egads » Fri Jan 25, 2008 11:18 am

Actually she said she needs the gate to keep the dogs in.

jakabedy
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Postby jakabedy » Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:18 pm

Thanks, all.

I did see the awesome wood and metal Asian-inspired gate in the earlier thread, and other postings in that thread. I don't think I'll be able to maintain wood that well. But there are some good design ideas in there.

Joe - Keep in mind that driveway gates are not all about pretention (maybe where you are this is the case?). We're in a rural area, our house is in the middle of three wooded acres, and the entire lot is fenced. It is canine Shangri-La around here, and the dogs have never been happier. But right now the driveway has a thoroughly unattractive stock gate with poultry wire strapped to it -- not the look I'm going for.

The gate is the big project for the year. I figured as long as I was going to spend the $$$ to run the power down there (about 250' from the house) and install an electric gate, it might as well be a fabulous MCM gate at that, with some lighting.

I have to admit, though, that there may be a bit of pretention at work. Is that what its called when I'm tired of getting in and out of the car twice every time I come and go? I want to sit on my rear and press a button, thankyouverymuch.
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SDR
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Postby SDR » Fri Jan 25, 2008 2:17 pm

A nice-looking combination of rolling or swinging gate and a pier or piers of matching brick, with a lantern or light fixture, could be a great addition to the property, especially if it were related to the architecture of the house. The steel parts could be painted a dark color matching the structure of the house ? If the same wood, in the same finish as the house, were used, would that be a satisfactory alternative ?

SDR

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Postby kraftdee » Fri Jan 25, 2008 2:52 pm

Here's another link that might interest you: http://www.eichlerforsale.com/eichler_fence

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Postby SDR » Fri Jan 25, 2008 3:13 pm

Nice -- several LottaLiving fences there. Nice stuff.

Are you intending a sliding or a swinging electric gate ?

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mid-mod driveway gate - seeking photos for inspiration

Postby AJ Fisher » Fri Jan 25, 2008 4:43 pm

Jakabedy,

I see you mentioned looking over the other thread related to mid century modern gates.

I work in a metal shop and 95% of my time is spent fabricating gates. Most of the ones we build are already chosen by the customer and most aren't interested in design, rather the function of the gate. As a result, I don't get to do much designing of gates, but every now and then I do. Actually, today, I drew up and built this gate frame:

Image

When work is slow, we usually build a few extra gates to have around. This affords me a chance to do some designing.

Many of our customers live in rural settings. The reasons for having a gate are as varied as the customers; some want to keep in animals or children, some desire prestige, and most want security. In rural areas surrounding here (Eugene/Springfield), homes are easy targets for break-ins; there are few neighbors to keep an eye on the neighbor's house while they are at work. Sadly, people looking for items to steal and then sell for drugs are another problem. Although a gate won't keep everyone out, it will ususally deter a potential thief enough that they will move on to the "next house". Another reason for having a gate is to keep people from using one's driveway as a turnaround.

A good metal fab shop should be able to take a drawing you do and suggest some functioning designs. For a house like yours, I would recommend a clean looking design without excess ornamentation. Most folks around here love the finials (the pointy things on gate pickets). I don't care for them myself.

Perhaps a gate similar to the one above, with (1) a lower portion that has closely spaced, thin pickets would keep your furry friends in and safe and (2) a more open, top portion that can be fabricated to resemble the form of your house would work. Of course I don't believe a curved top would complement your house so much. Perhaps a clean, straight top or a pitched gate top that resembles your house's silhouette would work. Here are some other quick suggestions:

Image

I also prefer slide gates. I think they look and perform better, but that's just my opinion. Finally, allow me to direct you to the website for the place I work. I built the site. We have a decent gallery of gates. Not many "modern" ones, but it may give you some ideas that you can take to a local metal shop. Our work website is:

http://www.acusecurity.com

Lemme know if you have any questions related to automatic gates.

-AJ

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Postby SDR » Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:36 pm

A nice gallery of gates, AJ. I looked for a sliding gate but didn't see one. In your experience, how does the appearance of a sliding gate differ, if at all, from a swinging one ?

The many ogee and simple arches are handsome; I agree that the form is not appropriate for a modern residence, in most cases. I'm afraid I also feel that a roof shape doesn't lend itself to the shape of a gate crest rail, either -- any more than would the outline of a chimney, or a tree. A gate is a kind of door, and is also a fence that moves. These seem to me to be the appropriate sources of form. It is understandable, and admirable, that one would try to relate the added object to what is there already. Copying an existing fence, or porch rail, or even the windows, in terms of weight and spacing and proportion and color, makes sense to me.

A nearby building here in San Francisco serves as an example. A brick block by Julia Morgan, built as a Jewish women's institute and now serving a Zen Buddhist organization, is decorated with white-painted wood trim; there are some round-arched windows. A simple horizontal iron fence of vertical bars, with matching gate, was added along the sidewalk to the left of the entry stairs some time ago, and painted. Now a small opening to a lower entrance, immediately to the right of those stairs, has been gated. Someone made a very nice gate, of natural teak with a gently-arched top. It is an insult to all that went before; it is entirely out of place -- despite being perfectly executed. Neither the material nor the shape has anything to do with details of the building, nor with the existing fence and gate. The obvious choice would have been to match the existing ironwork, wouldn't it ? (Mixing shallow arches with half-round ones is particularly troubling, to me !)

Thanks for the excellent drawings. That new gate above is quite handsome, and obviously well crafted. I look forward to seeing more work from your hand.

The environment of the driveway where this new gate will go will determine the placement of piers, and the direction of the sliding gate, won't it ? It would be good to have a photo of the driveway before suggesting a design. Would a sliding gate require as many as three piers ? I can imagine, in keeping with the house, a broad and low pier of the same brick as the house, and a simple grid of horizontal or vertical bars in a rectangular format, like your lower left example, perhaps.

SDR

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rockland
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Postby rockland » Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:49 pm

i visualized something similar. upper left in your examples AJ. i think looking at japanese garden gates, the lower section of most,
have a light and airy feel to them?. now push button open and close is another issue.
looks like steel construction will give you the look you want. you just need to find the standard elec gate with a custom design?

saw a house near me on google earth. nice roof line. looked vintage. 5-10 acres. as many homes around here have, and a lake!
took a drive, (play lost and check it out). darn gate in the way...

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Postby jakabedy » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:25 pm

AJ -

Thanks for the site. If only you were in Alabama, we could create something great! I don't have a photo of the actual approach and existing gate -- will try to get one tomorrow. But below is how the drive looks in the spring, taken from roughly where the gate is.

The existing fence is nothing to write home about -- a wire fence with wood posts. But it blends into the trees, and the entire road frontage is trees, save for the driveway. So the gate and columns will be what is noticed.

I agree that the roofline of the house isn't workable for the topline of the gate. I want the gate to be simple. (It probably will be a rolling gate given the slope of the driveway and the short approach between the street and the fence). I want to try to carry the feel of the house into the columns. Maybe simple columns of matching brick, but with a brown "beam" coming out on one side to hold a hanging globe lamp.

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Postby Futura Girl » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:32 pm

rocknlounge - can you please check to make sure your email is correct? thanks. it's bouncing back.

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Postby SDR » Fri Jan 25, 2008 9:08 pm

This page has drawings of a cantilever sliding gate mechanism.

http://www.amazinggates.com/sliding_gates.html

The other type of sliding gate requires a track across the driveway -- most likely used when a dead flat and paved driveway apron is present ?

Another site had this list of questions -- useful for thinking about the options ?


Basic Questions to Ask When Choosing a Gate Operator

1. What type of gate needs to be automated?

(Note: automatic operators are not recommended for pedestrian gates!)
Slide: V-Groove track? Elevated Roller?
Barrier Bar: What type of arm? Wood? Aluminum? Fiberglass?
Swing: What type of gate material?
2. Is the gate new or existing? If the installation is on an existing gate, open and close it manually to assure a smooth operation. Remember, Gate Operators do not correct gate problems!

3. What is the size of the gate?

Height?
Weight?
Length?
4. How many cycles will the gate open and close per day?

5. Which way does the gate open?

6. What type of traffic is using the gate? The type of traffic will determine the type of access control, the type of safety, and the amount of security needed.

Single family residence?
Warehouse/Commercial?
Apartments/Multiple family residential?
7. How will the gate be opened for vehicle entry?

Guard
Key switch
Key card/digital key
Radio control
Phone entry
Other
8. How will the gate close after entry into the property?


Guard
Key switch
Key card/digital key
Radio control
Phone entry
Other
9. How will the gate be opened for exiting vehicles?

Guard
Key switch
Key card/digital key
Radio control
Phone entry
Other


10. How will the gate be closed after the vehicle exits?

Guard
Key switch
Key card/digital key
Radio control
Phone entry
Other


11. What voltage and phase are required for the gate to operate?

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SDR
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Postby SDR » Sat Jan 26, 2008 3:42 pm

Would a house number, and maybe a mail box, be a useful part of the construction ?

SDR
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Joe
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Postby Joe » Sat Jan 26, 2008 9:16 pm

if a gate is seriously needed, just go for a custom gate as simple as possible. no need to "decorate" it. Inexpensive materials, simple design, effective... that would be Modern.

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rockland
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Postby rockland » Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:01 am

this is a nice simple design. you don't need something so big or such privacy.
but a lower version of this? and perhaps adding spacers into the design. maybe using something
hardy and longlasting like ipe? I like the boards laying horizontal. with a 3inch spacer, only 4 or 5 boards
would be needed...handsome, clean, and modern with out being too decorative?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/edgar/1836 ... et-506363/
(this photo is from someones flickr set of reference. is it cool to borrow this? especially not knowing who
took the photo or where it came from? who knows the manners for this instance. will the owner of the flickr set
be asked today if this photo can be borrowed or should i have asked to use it? is their a 'miss manners' of the
internet for doing such a thing? ...just wondering) i've been referencing and bookmarking like crazy for some
upcoming spring projects. just don't see much about proper do's and don'ts.


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