help selecting a tree...

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redneckmodern
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help selecting a tree...

Postby redneckmodern » Sun May 18, 2008 11:46 am

hi... an odd one. wondering if you MCM gardeners have suggestions...

in the atrium in our eichler, the spot where the old rubber tree sat gets about 4 hours of intense summer sun from 12-4pm. the rest of the time, it sits in bright shade.

the old rubber tree grew to maturity in a covered atrium -- we do not want to cover the atrium for a number of reasons, one of which was that i was meant to look up to the sky, not into corrugated fiberglass which was what we removed.

the new (small) rubber tree's leaves are getting "burned" and shriveling up. it is not happy.

http://redneckmodern.typepad.com/rednec ... r-red.html

so, looking for a specimen that:

-- grows 8-10 feet tall (or can be trimmed to that size)
-- has an upright, sculptural quality with the added ability to cast shade for the adjacent window/area.
-- can take the 4 hours of intense sun (and bright shade other times)
-- is MCM appropriate for norcal (i.e.: we're not in palm springs, although a palo verde tree is pretty)

for instance, a japanese maple would be nice, but the heat and sun methinks would torch it... perhaps there's a variety that i've no yet discovered that does not look like cousin "IT" (but doesn't grow to 20 feet either) and likes the sun.

with the exception of the lack of sun tolerance, the rubber tree is the perfect plant... perhaps there's a way to keep it.

thoughts? (and thanks)...

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Miguel
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Postby Miguel » Sun May 18, 2008 1:18 pm

One of my favorites is the Garnet Japanese Maple, with its red delicate leaves and droopy look:
Image
Image
It grows well in shaded areas with some hours of sunlight, as long as the roots are protected by ground cover such as mulch or river rock.
More info here: http://www.havlis.cz/karta_en.php?kytkaid=78
Last edited by Miguel on Sun May 18, 2008 4:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Luka
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Postby Luka » Sun May 18, 2008 4:21 pm

We have a Japanese Maple in our atrium which gets just about the same amount of direct sunshine per day and it does very well.

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Postby jonu » Mon May 19, 2008 8:44 am

My Japanese maple gets quite a bit of direct sun.
We purchased the tree from a large nursery in Moorpark, CA.
The nursery kept it and the rest of their Japanese maples in full sun.

-Jon

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Miguel
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Postby Miguel » Mon May 19, 2008 9:00 am

Another plant that does well in shade with some hours of direct sunlight is a tree fern (a catch-all term that included numerous genera and varietals):
ImageImage
More info here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_fern
and a lot more here: http://www.baumfarn.at/treefern/

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Postby spinsLPs » Mon May 19, 2008 9:06 am

I would be careful with the tree fern. When I lived in Venice, CA we had a yard full of them. They shed this fine brown dust that will get all over everything.

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Josquin
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Ferns

Postby Josquin » Mon May 19, 2008 10:21 am

As ferns go, I would recommend Woodwardia fimbriata or giant chain fern. In ideal conditions, it can grow over 9ft high. It's a California Native.
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Slim and Gabby
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I second the use of a native-it will be happier long run

Postby Slim and Gabby » Mon May 19, 2008 1:29 pm

Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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Native Plants

Postby Josquin » Mon May 19, 2008 2:53 pm


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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Mon May 19, 2008 4:21 pm

Josquin:
We knew you were kinda on the same vibe with us. I may NEVER get over the loss of that oooollld ceanothus!
We just returned from a backcountry trip and have done some great seed collecting. Expecting some NICE stuff in our yard next year.


We were thinking about you in the So. Cal fires. Hope that wasn't too close of a call for you. Your yard sounded great- wouldn't want to see any damage there!

Oh, and BTW, from another post, we are totally envious of your bathroom tiles!
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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Postby Luka » Mon May 19, 2008 5:10 pm

We tried a tree fern in our atrium, in an area where we had partial shade and even there it was burned to a crisp and died pretty quickly, poor thing.

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Native Selections

Postby Josquin » Mon May 19, 2008 6:21 pm

Slim and Gabby,

Thanks for the bathroom tile kudos; it a shame they are discontinued. Sorry to hear about the old ceanothus. We have a concha, Yankee points, dark stars and a hoaryleaf. We love those beautiful blue blossoms in the spring. They would make a great addition to a courtyard garden.

We could see the local fires, but they were about five miles away. We are bracing for a terrible fire season.

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Postby redneckmodern » Mon May 19, 2008 7:29 pm

Last edited by redneckmodern on Tue May 20, 2008 8:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Tue May 20, 2008 7:14 am

Hmm.
Your palm place sounds interesting. We're all about the oaks, but glad to see someone SERIOUS about palms versus those sad sack banana palms you see plunked around thoughtlessly.

As for the ceanothus, I couldn't really find a good picture online. They naturally have a really bushy habit, but can be trained to great effect with nice twisty trunks. Not just the blue flowers, but many shades of lavender, white and yellow are found. You just have to find the right nursery to understand you want a tree specimen. Wish I had a picture to show you-they can really be great.

I'd LOVE to see a manzanita in an Eichler atrium- I think it would be really great. Just be aware that there will be berries and leaves to think of.

Good luck to you!
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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Ceanothus

Postby Josquin » Tue May 20, 2008 7:33 am

A good tree like ceanothus is the megacarpus. Ceanothus megacarpus is a large white flowering variety, which can be trained as a tree, with showy grey brown bark.

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Postby pinetree » Tue May 20, 2008 8:06 am

i saw a small but interesting variety of sub-trees during a trip to dry garden in oakland. they have tons of very sculptural and mostly drought tolerant plants at their nursery.


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Postby redneckmodern » Tue May 20, 2008 9:11 am

to give a quick visual...


Image

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Postby Carlos Araujo » Tue May 20, 2008 9:12 am

As a native fan, I love ceanothus but it I think you might end up with a large shrub. For a native tree local to your area I recommend a western redbud.
"Todos vuelven a la tierra en que nacieron" Ruben Blades

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Postby redneckmodern » Tue May 20, 2008 10:26 am

redbud's get tall, correct? we're looking at 10-12 feet tops. we're thinking of a "forest pansy" variety for the front yard.

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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Tue May 20, 2008 3:42 pm

Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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redneckmodern
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Postby redneckmodern » Tue May 20, 2008 5:24 pm


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Postby jesgord » Tue May 20, 2008 5:46 pm

From everything I've seen posted in this thread so far, I really like Slim&Gabby's suggestion of the "Dr. Hurd" Manzanita....wish these could grow out east. The gnarly trunk shape and curling bark are just too cool :D

Image

Image

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Manzanita

Postby Josquin » Tue May 20, 2008 9:12 pm

Here's a 8 ft high big leaf manzanita in front of garden wall in Claremont, California.

Image

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Postby jesgord » Wed May 21, 2008 9:19 am

These Manzanitas truly have an incredible sculptural quality about them. Not to highjack the thread, but there is a timely and interesting two part article in the SF Chronicle about a new variety of Manzanita recently discovered in San Fran. The attempt/struggle to have the tree protected by landmark status seems to parallel the issues confronted when trying to have MCM houses and building's protected.

Part 1 (Talks about the discovery and possible origin of the tree)



Part 2 (Talks about the struggle to have the "tree" landmarked)


Carlos Araujo
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Postby Carlos Araujo » Wed May 21, 2008 9:03 pm

Yes the redbud can ge up to 14'. If you're looking for something a little shorter and sculptural my vote is also for a tall manzanita. Ask your native nursery rep to get a fine upright specimen.
"Todos vuelven a la tierra en que nacieron" Ruben Blades

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Slim and Gabby
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Wow-the manzanita story is great!

Postby Slim and Gabby » Fri May 23, 2008 5:18 pm

Jesgord
Aren't you an honorary Californian already? Kudos on finding that story! ( I conferred New Yorker status on my sister when she told someone she didn't drive anymore-yeah, right-a Californian?)

What a saga! We just watched a documentary about moving the cemetaries (and bodies!) in the 1930's....weird. I just love manzanita and think it doesn't get the attention it deserves. I'm guessing there are many rooting for that plant to get status. They are such interesting plants to watch long term.

Thanks to all of you for an interesting discussion.
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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rockland
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Postby rockland » Sat May 31, 2008 5:02 pm

bump.
I'm so impressed with an across the board plant interest...
and knowledge.
What did you decide?

I have a 1/4 acre, moss covered, that i am not going to tend at all.
About 600 japanese maples have seeded. A lucky season and timing.
(we inherited 4 that are in their 40's)
We have taken a hundred or so and boxed them. And now a foot tall.
I don't want to cash in at all. just hope to have some survivors!


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