Exterior door painting tips?

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Luka
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Exterior door painting tips?

Postby Luka » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:45 am

I'm hoping some of you might be able to give us some tips on how to get a smooth finish on an exterior door. We tackled ours this past weekend and we're having a really hard time getting an even look.

It's red which I understand is always tough but let me tell you what we've done so far. Painted with white primer. Next coat mixed half paint color and half primer. Three coats of red. We are using a foam roller. We sanded between coats. The paint is exterior high gloss, water-based latex (with the new rules in California we could not locate oil based paint).

Thanks for any advice.

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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:11 pm

Um, who told you to do it like that? WOW, that's one of the strangest methods I've heard (don't take that comment personally!). Start all over again...
Strip the paint off completely, what you've just put on: get a heat gun that will speed the process considerably. Too thick of paint will do weird things, you'll be surprised at how long it can take to cure when too thick: literally months. The paint underneath, way at the bottom, can't breath, actually off-gas to cure: there's all kinds of stuff in latex paint like diethyl ether, you know sleeping gas? Prime the door with the primer of your choice. I like Kilz, it has a tack (slightly sticky) to it that stays even after it has cured. White primer is good because you can see where your paint is thin. The primer coat doesn't have to be beautiful, it's only giving the paint something to adhere to. Make sure your primer is cured at least 24-hours. Remove the door from the hinges and lay it flat: saw horses are good if you don't want to stoop for extended periods of time while painting. Laying it flat will help your paint to not run, and you'll be using gravity to get the paint to lay flatter. DON'T SAND ANYTHING! Latex paint never really gets hard, it's not like oil based that gets a hard surface you can sand. Don't mix the primer with the paint, they're actually two different kinds of medium used: yes they'll mix, but that's not the point here. A foam roller will work very well to apply your color coat, or paint. Roll in even, long strokes, always moving in the same direction, with the grain of the door/wood. Give it an hour or so between coats: three coats will be more than enough. Don't paint in direct sunlight, yes it might dry faster, but if you're spreading paint and it's starting to cure before you've finished that coat, you might get very ugly ripples, kinda like cottage cheese. Oh, and take all the hardware off the door before you do the color coat, and start in the morning, so you can put your door back up in the evening, this will keep the bug, animals and unwanted humans out... When you have your final coat on, then you can put it in the sun.
Hope this helped,
Slim
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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turboblown
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Postby turboblown » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:06 pm

You can have tint added to the primer. I used a medium gray tint when doing my orange doors. Oh....don't use any garbage paint like Behr. Get yourself a quality paint such as Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore from a real paint store and not a big-box store. I've used Kilz2 the past few weeks, but don't really care for its texture. The advantage to Kilz is that it goes on thick which is nice if you wet sand the primer after hard.
If you want a smooth finish, get a high pressure spray system that does at least 2000 PSI with a .015" tip (NOT a Wagner sprayer!!). Thin the paint 1/2 pint of water to 1 gallon of paint. I always let the primer set up for 24 hours, wet sand it smooth with 180 grit, sit for at least another day and topcoat with the sprayer. I spray one very light "tack coat" and after if gets sticky, I lay one good coat on thick with the sprayer. If the doors are off and sitting flat, you can lay the paint so much better than when vertical. When spraying thinned paint, it will look like glass when done if dried slowly. Let the paint cure slowly- forced air, sunlight, or heat wil accelerate the evaporation and on many paints will take away some of the gloss. I just painted 3400 sq.ft. over the past 3 weeks and sprayed most of it. You can't get as good of a job with a brush or roller. Oh...I use a Graco DX sprayer at max pressure and .013"-.015" tips.

My 2 cents

Luka
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Postby Luka » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:13 pm

Thanks Turboblown - sounds like a good plan!

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Joe
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Postby Joe » Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:13 pm

be sure to go with semi-gloss so you can clean it.

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turboblown
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Postby turboblown » Thu Oct 15, 2009 8:48 pm

If you have a good base, go for full gloss!

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johnnyapollo
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Postby johnnyapollo » Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:56 am

One thing not mentioned - use an exterior paint - it has mildew and fungicides, UV protectents and other additives that will help keep it from discoloring or fading (yellow paint is the worst for sun-fading) - that will make it last longer.

-- John
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."
Philip K. Dick

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http://modernseeker.blogspot.com


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