bathroom ventilation

Home improvement Q&A, pictures and news fro Mid Century Modern Homes and Houses(NOT for Real Estate)

Moderators: I_LUV_POWER!!!!, Joe, Adriene, moderns-r-us, Tony, Futura Girl, nichols, Java

kraftdee
Modern Socialite
Posts: 43
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:06 am
Location: Torrance, CA

bathroom ventilation

Postby kraftdee » Mon Feb 15, 2010 12:53 pm

Currently the shower is hitting a wood framed window so the contractor is telling us that we have to build a wall up a little higher so that we won't end up with water damage. We have a high window and a half stationery and half louvre where they will be building higher. They're recommending a casement that opens up.
Does anyone else have this and does it provide enough ventilation for moisture? Any other ideas?
TIA!

CapitalMod
Modern Master
Posts: 237
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Washington, DC

Postby CapitalMod » Mon Feb 15, 2010 1:51 pm

I have the same situation as you- a wood double sash in the shower. I cannot imagine the insanity that conceived it. Anyway, I had the window replaced with a vinyl one. However the sill and the molding are still there and made of wood.

So, I hang a vinyl, louvered shade to protect the area. I painted the wood with marine paint from the boat shop. Lastly, I have a piece of 2x2 painted with the boat paint and laying across the sill should any water make it trough the shade and down into the window. This works although I have to take down and clean the shade constantly. You can also cut a piece of shower curtain which works better but looks worse.

I would have to do what your contractor says and I don't have the cash for that now. Is he right? I would defer to some of the handier people here.

FRaC
Modern Socialite
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:43 pm
Location: lo sangeles, ca

Postby FRaC » Mon Feb 15, 2010 1:54 pm

i would suggest an aluminum framed window or a vinyl clad window in a shower. i know vinyl clad windows aren't ideal (most people would say they're 'gross') but in a shower situation i think it's important to put in something that's going to last.

the previous building code (in california) allowed you to use an operable window in place of mechanical ventilation (ceiling fan exhaust) but i'm looking at the current international building code and it states bathrooms must be mechanically ventilated.

so a ceiling fan exhaust will do the best at getting the moist air out but if that's not an option try to get the largest casement window you can. what size window is the contractor suggesting and how large is the bathroom?

User avatar
Joe
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 4624
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:10 am
Location: sunny Eugene, Oregon
Contact:

Postby Joe » Mon Feb 15, 2010 2:54 pm

use marine grade paint on your wood window. I have a wood casement window in my shower

kraftdee
Modern Socialite
Posts: 43
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:06 am
Location: Torrance, CA

Postby kraftdee » Mon Feb 15, 2010 2:56 pm

Thanks for your comments. harchitecture, the space they were sugggesting for the window measures apx. 21" high and 4'9 inches wide. I believe they suggested 2 windows opening out. The measurement of the bathroom is 4'9 inches wide and 12' long.

egads
Mondo Lounge Lizard
Posts: 1671
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 8:25 pm
Location: Long Beach CA

Postby egads » Mon Feb 15, 2010 3:50 pm

Like Joe, I have a wood window that goes all the way across the back wall (5') that where the tub/shower combo is.
I use a plain nylon shower curtain across the back. It works well, and when that bath gets redone, I will add a sill of stone
or man made material. And then probably put the shower curtain back. It's the best shower caddy ever.

It is really hard to picture your situation without pictures. Without seeing, and going with the contractor recommendations,
I might suggest an awning window. Those open out, usually also opening a space at their top as they go out. That would maximize
the venting.

I have a client with a vinyl sliding door in his shower. But that opens onto a small private patio.

Will closing up the amount of window area be undesirable? I hate to have contractors make design decisions. Not that they are not contributors to a design process. A window at the end of the bathroom, running probably wall to wall, creates a strong horizontal
line or swath who's size and height are important. So carefully consider the size and shape of what you put in. Cut craft paper mock
ups and tape them up to visualize.

Give more details and you will get more focused responses.

User avatar
moderns-r-us
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 1836
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 6:16 pm
Location: Kansas City

Postby moderns-r-us » Mon Feb 15, 2010 8:01 pm

kraftdee wrote:Thanks for your comments. harchitecture, the space they were sugggesting for the window measures apx. 21" high and 4'9 inches wide. I believe they suggested 2 windows opening out. The measurement of the bathroom is 4'9 inches wide and 12' long.



21" high and 4'9 inches wide sounds more like a job for an awning window, or two, but pictures would help.
"Better Living Through Modernism"

kraftdee
Modern Socialite
Posts: 43
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:06 am
Location: Torrance, CA

Postby kraftdee » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:19 pm

Thank you all for your help. I will post a picture on Wednesday.


Return to “Mid Century Modern Houses and Homes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AHrefsBot and 7 guests