Airfloor?

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dani
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Airfloor?

Postby dani » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:42 pm

So... we are at a loss here. We have been doing some digging. We have what is called an Air Radiant Conditioning system. Made by airadco, and suggested by our architect, then installed in our home. So what does all this mean? we have about an inch of concrete over the system, so no polished concrete floors. does anyone have a similar system?

this one is REAL close http://www.airfloor.com/

So now we are back to deciding on floors... any thoughts or suggestions? good thing we were on concrete contractor #3 and nothing has been started ... ugh.

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Postby jakabedy » Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:50 am

I can honestly say I never knew such a thing existed. But it seems like a really good idea! I've never attempted to polish a slab, but is it not possible in this case because there is only an inch of slab above the plenum? Does the polishing process cut significantly into the thickness? perhaps there is a way to pour a thin skim coat of some kind that will allow a polish, but not interfere with the heating.
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Postby scowsa » Thu Oct 07, 2010 7:19 am

Well, they say hindsight is 20/20 but I was puzzled why the concrete was not finished appropriately when this system was installed -- which if I am reading this correctly, was when you owned the house. In our new house, we have radiant floor heating, using hot water, and we had the floors finished so they could then be just sealed.

Then I recall in an different post you had mentioned the floors were installed to allow wood block flooring so I am assuming you then decided not to do that.

So why not now consider cork flooring?

There are products that install easily and are suitable for under-floor heating, such as this one


This one is a half-inch thick so would probably address the edge concerns you raised in another post.

Cork flooring was often used in MCMs.
scowsa

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dani
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Postby dani » Thu Oct 07, 2010 11:55 am

scowsa, I will check out the link.... my husband is not the fondest of cork, but we will see LOL. It is growing on me. All techbuilts I have seen have wood block (parquet), cork, VCT or brick stone flooring. I have also seen the 2 story houses with wood, and carpet. Concrete is not my first choice, but his. Our house was built to allow for the wood flooring. It seems the concrete is more of a rough pour. It would have to be ground at least 1/8-1/4" they are saying. I'm just not sure I want all that prep work done to 1" of concrete. It is breaking apart on the edges as it is, not sure if they filled it when they did the carpet or what...

Anyway, we are trying to find something "organic" feeling and cork would do it. Our house did have slate spec'd for a while, but $ was a factor and they decided on all wood floors instead. I like slate but it's costly and my husband wants a natural stone or nothing.

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Postby WiscoUsonIan » Thu Oct 14, 2010 11:04 am

again dani, If you're interested in the overlay option like my floors I'd be happy to show mine off sometime, If of course you're interested in possibly going that route. Good luck with the decision!
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Postby Joe » Thu Oct 14, 2010 9:45 pm

I don't suggest wood floor over a radiant system. debated many times on the Eichler Network boards.

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Postby redneckmodern » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:07 am

i would second joe's recommendation. although your system is part-radiant / part-forced air, why work against the system?

a neighbor installed a slate-like tile throughout his house. it looks amazing. natural, yet consistent -- and $5/sqft (materials)... plus, with hard-tile (as opposed to glue-down cork), the irregularities of the subsurface will be far less of an issue and you'll be building up a bit more of a thermal mass which will work great with your HVAC system... then, of course, area rugs where wanted...

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Postby egads » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:06 pm

Sorry, but to me the chestnut color does not seem very MCM. I'd go with the natural as all of it will darken with age. But that is your personal decision. And will also be influenced by the tile choice. But if you go too dark brown, it will look Home Depot even though you know how good it is. Just look at what the flippers use and stay away from that. There's nothing like plain oak. It is what wood floors have been done in for years and takes a beating. My choice for a more modern clean look would be maple. Like a gym floor. Remember, interior design wise, this is all background. The rugs, upholstery & art are where to put your style. This should not distract. The greatest compliment you could get is if no one notices it at all.

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Postby Joe » Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:27 pm

cork

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Postby rockland » Sat Oct 16, 2010 8:40 am

Image

Looks like good quality.
Has a very similar tone to my original oak that has a patina now.

I do like cork. My cork entry i discovered was applied double layer to give the
even level transition to the oak and terrazzo tile in the kitchen.

Any hints why the original floor was removed? Probably just for the wall-to-wall
carpet craziness in the 80's? Or i suppose for the efficiency of the heated floor.
The original may have failed?

Not every original choice held up over time. Our lower level is mysterious why
the tiles were removed. After finally replacing the washer/dryer we found a very
small leak...just a drip every 30 seconds but enough to slowly soak the slab.

I think your choices are good but i'm with Joe on cork. Warm, gentle underfoot,
absorbs sound, and very durable.

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Postby dani » Sat Oct 16, 2010 5:11 pm

Well we did do some shopping today, we still have yet to find a tile for the entry. We are looking for something like a rectangle slate look alike. We brought home a larger bamboo sample and it seems a bit dark. We did bring home some cork samples too. We are liking most of them. Any suggestions on a good company? There are a ton of them out there and prices seem to be all over the board. would you stray away from a floating floor still? or just look for glue down? Given the issue of the grade differences, I like the idea of the thickness of the floating. I am not sure how much difference in heating the two will have.

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Postby egads » Sat Oct 16, 2010 7:32 pm

Because of the unevenness of the existing floor surface, a floating floor will be easiest to put in. Back when your house was new, the mastic they used was thick (usually containing asbestos) and was used to build up low spots.
Cork also comes attached to floating sheets like wood does. For tile, I'd look for a porcelain rather than ceramic.

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Postby dani » Tue Oct 19, 2010 11:21 am

90% there!!!

We have made headway and finally got it narrowed down. Most of the house, the blue area's will be slate. The tile we like only comes in 16x16" sizes. we tossed around the idea of cutting them in half to create 8x16" tiles, but decided on the 16x16" tiles in a running bond pattern like this, we are leaning toward small grout lines in a gray.
Image

This is the actual tile, but it's in a 12x12 size for easier transport.
Image

This is our house layout.
Image

all blue areas will be slate. The brown area will be cork. (the utility room and 2 bathrooms will stay as is original tile) Basically it's the girls rooms in cork and we are tossing around the idea of the master dressing area in cork, but are undecided. The reason we are breaking it up in the bedrooms is to have a softer play area for the kids, but have a durable surface for my husband and the dog in the rest of the rooms. We live in the woods and a lot gets tracked in. I'm constantly picking up sticks and leaves right now, in a month or 2 it will be snow and mud. We decided on slate over porcelain or ceramic, because we wanted a natural material. We know there is more up keep with slate, but like the character of it. We are going to float the cork in the areas it goes. The (girls) bedrooms are the warmest in the house, so the heat transfer from the floor is not as important. We like the idea that these floor coverings could always be removed and replaced if need be. I would LOVE to put this cork all through out, but I would still need some slate in the entry and office, and I like the look of one flooring from the living room, down the hall and into the master. I am finding it hard to get one type of flooring that will serve well in the entry and in the living room, and slate seems to fit that mold. Also, our outer decks are a gray color (the same as the exterior of the house) so the color will run through to the exterior "floors".

Cork (our top pattern choice)
Image

our living area on final walk through day.... not our stuff.
Image
Image

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Postby classic form » Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:20 pm

I like the choices and it sounds like you have spent a lot of time thinking this through...but, and just one mans opinion here, I am not sure of the layout of the slate. I'm assuming you'll lay them out to see how they look in your room before commiting to the running bond pattern. Here's a pic of our living room with similar slate to give you an idea of another layout.

Image

Image

Image

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Postby johnnyapollo » Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:19 am

If you go back to leveling - how about terrazzo? Seems like you can over-pour and polish (or did I miss something?)
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