So a strange question about "dirty raindrop bounce"

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Scott NC
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So a strange question about "dirty raindrop bounce"

Postby Scott NC » Fri Nov 28, 2014 4:28 pm

I honestly don't know how to word it except that.
My flat roof facia has always had the drip guard
properly in place. But even so, water still drips down below.
And not one place around the perimeter of my house is
there a welcoming spot for the rain to not bounce an abundant amount of
dirt onto my panels, brick, or anything that is 2 feet high within
ground level. Rocks don't cut it. I can't grow grass. Plants don't grow.
I included one side of the house somewhat showing the ground and
how the panels will be totally dirty after a rain. The 2nd pic I just "painted"
in what my vision of concrete would be. It would bounce, but at least be a clean bounce and if I wanted plants, they'll be in pots. This is somewhat my
last resort after 7 years of dealing with it. Seems most of the west coast eichlers, etc have their houses surrounded by concrete, or at least the concrete starts where the overhang ends. Any help?

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egads
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Postby egads » Fri Nov 28, 2014 6:45 pm

What you need are rain gutters, they direct water away. Of course on a modern house one would need to have "box" style ones made by a sheet metal guy. The seamless machines do have a simple plain box former available to fit them, but those guys rarely have one.

Edit: (got called away in the middle of this) One also uses plain, smooth box downspouts. Ones with soldered angles and not preformed ELs. The very bottom most one can be a premade piece, but the actual downspouts need to disappear, painted to match the surface they run across. Sometimes that even means they get painted different colors in different places along their run.

Directing water away from a building's foundation is very important. Houses do not like wet feet. It can cause sinking, dry rot, and make a hospitable environment for termites. It is best to get the excess water away. A slab around the permimiter is not really going to address the splash back, just make it less muddy. The water, muddy or clean needs to be directed away.

Do a Google image search on box gutters to get an idea of what I'm talking about. Most gutter & sheet metal guys are going to consider this work "commercial" because this what is specified in such projects.

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Scott NC
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Postby Scott NC » Sat Nov 29, 2014 4:40 am

egads wrote:What you need are rain gutters, they direct water away. Of course on a modern house one would need to have "box" style ones made by a sheet metal guy. .

Do a Google image search on box gutters to get an idea of what I'm talking about. Most gutter & sheet metal guys are going to consider this work "commercial" because this what is specified in such projects.


Definitely wanted to pursue the square gutters, but never could attain it because of money. A lot of times it's simply the rain falling from sky that bounces on the ground. It's not always the rain from the roof making the mess. My overhangs depth varies around the entire perimeter of house. Some areas it's 3 ft., some 2 feet, some 1 ft, some 1 inch.

I may try and think outside the box on this one. Mainly because of $.
Buy 1.5" or 2.5" square tubing.... probably pvc, put it on my table saw and cut one side off. I don't need a huge 5" square gutter up there. No leaves/junk.

Or better yet I could drill holes on top all the way across spacing them approx. half inch or inch apart. This way the stability of square still in tact.
These 10' tubes at ~$15 could possibly work.


http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=24672&catid=817

egads
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Postby egads » Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:02 am

I once used the bottom channel that is used for steel stud work (the vertical ones are full of holes). In that case I did not need to have downspouts, I was just redirecting. If you are willing and able you can find a sheet metal place to bend the gutter Channels and make up the downspout offsets. The plain downspout material is a stock item. I did this once for a customer and it was labor intensive on my part. Especially properly preping, priming, and painting.
So work on it a little bit at a time as you can afford it.

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Scott NC
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Postby Scott NC » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:24 pm

egads wrote:I once used the bottom channel that is used for steel stud work (the vertical ones are full of holes). In that case I did not need to have downspouts, I was just redirecting. If you are willing and able you can find a sheet metal place to bend the gutter Channels and make up the downspout offsets. The plain downspout material is a stock item. I did this once for a customer and it was labor intensive on my part. Especially properly preping, priming, and painting.
So work on it a little bit at a time as you can afford it.


Egads,
You're a genius....120" for $6.47

http://www.lowes.com/pd_19602-1278-162653_0__

Or even this could work(lower profile) if it fits under the drip lip!

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Dietrich-Industries-1-2-in-x-10-ft-Metal-L-Trim-360082321/100319045?N=5yc1vZbuim

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Gibraltar-Building-Products-10-ft-Metal-L-Trim-Corner-Bead-CBLL/202948027?N=5yc1vZc7qn#specifications

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Gibraltar-Building-Products-10-ft-Vinyl-L-Shaped-Corner-Bead-70085/202092947

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johnnyapollo
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Postby johnnyapollo » Sun Nov 30, 2014 4:29 am

Depending on the pitch of your roof AND the amount of rain you typically receive, I think you'll be pressing your luck with something smaller than a 3" channel. There's a reason most gutters are 5-6."
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."
Philip K. Dick

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Scott NC
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Postby Scott NC » Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:23 pm

johnnyapollo wrote:Depending on the pitch of your roof AND the amount of rain you typically receive, I think you'll be pressing your luck with something smaller than a 3" channel. There's a reason most gutters are 5-6."


no doubt. It can get heavy.
Just want to see if it redirects it.
I can't stand the look of having gutters up there.
Previous owners had the traditional rounded
ones in certain places of the perimeter. It was
like a ray of sunshine when I took them off.
So, as usual I complain yet want the asthetics of it all too.
Main reason I was leaning toward cement around the bases.
But will see what happens next rain with those little $1.67 corner
beads placed up there.

egads
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Postby egads » Sun Nov 30, 2014 3:04 pm

You could at least price out the right thing. Like I said, I only used the channel to redirect, not catch all of it. If you were willing to pay for concrete, you might be find the gutters equal. The expensive part is having it done.

I am just too much of a gardener to embrace too much hardscaping. The whole point of a MCM house with walls of glass is to bring the landscape inside. While a low maintenance simple minimalist landscape might seem appealing, it can go from Palm Springs modern to trailer park very quickly.

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Scott NC
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Postby Scott NC » Sun Nov 30, 2014 4:00 pm

egads wrote:You could at least price out the right thing. Like I said, I only used the channel to redirect, not catch all of it. If you were willing to pay for concrete, you might be find the gutters equal. The expensive part is having it done.

I am just too much of a gardener to embrace too much hardscaping. The whole point of a MCM house with walls of glass is to bring the landscape inside. While a low maintenance simple minimalist landscape might seem appealing, it can go from Palm Springs modern to trailer park very quickly.

I am too, but have never had any luck over 7 years, so as I'm
painting the exterior, I'm stripping things for a semi clean slate.
If I didn't live in a climate where 2 days ago it was 26 deg for the low,
and today it was 73, I'd be all about lushness. I envy you ppl in cali. I've even ordered horsetails online and even those were so damn hard to keep
alive. And those aren't even "lush". lol



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johnnyapollo
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Postby johnnyapollo » Mon Dec 01, 2014 2:28 am

It's less about the weight and more about the amount of water that fills the channel - once it overfills you're back to square one. A very narrow channel will overfill quickly - wider channels will allow for more time for the water to hit a downspout or rain-chain.

I've had friends use rain louvers to great effect:
http://homesteadsystemscorp.com/h_rainspray/

The water is deflected from the house - it might be worth experimenting with these to see how they look and work.
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."

Philip K. Dick



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Scott NC
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Postby Scott NC » Mon Dec 01, 2014 3:11 pm

update. Going a different route to see what happens.
Going to get some sod tomorrow and give one side of the
house the experiment. I like the roof clean fascia/flashing too much
to cover it with something that was never there in the first place
when built.
So I'll try for some St Augustine sod which does well with shade.
I'll see if this acts as a cushion when it rains. That's what I'm hoping for.
Then again it is winter, so sod might be dormant:P
we'll see.


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