Base Molding: A naive Q

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bitzala
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Base Molding: A naive Q

Postby bitzala » Sat Sep 03, 2005 7:19 am

Is there a standard type of base molding for MCM p&b homes?

thanks for any input,

bitzala

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Postby SIB723 » Mon Sep 05, 2005 8:27 am


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Postby SDR » Tue Sep 06, 2005 4:58 pm

A compromise would be to buy the square-edge and hit it with a sanding block, "easing" the edge -- which would stlll be a little more vulnerable than a softer edge, as you say.

If you can get away with it, a trim as small as 1 1/2" would be appropriate -- the main thing is minimalism and simplicity. Consistency is a hallmark of all responsible and sensitive design decisions; look to other trim details in the structure to determine the best edge detail, based on existing choices. The eye unconsciously registers similar vs dissimilar details as "insignificant" as the degree of rounding of "square"moldings (for instance).

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Postby morbank » Tue Sep 06, 2005 7:14 pm

I would agree that a rounded edge is more MCM. I think a square edge is more "modern." Our Eichler home actually had all 2 1/2" rounded edge base molding, but interestingly enough it was doublesided. All of the molding was damaged when we removed it to redo the floors. We ended up having all of it custom manufactured--it surprisingly was not that expensive. We just had a really hard time finding molding that was "simple" enough, thin enough, tall enough, etc. We also wanted our molding to match our philipine mahogany walls so we had it made out of similar material.

We had a simple square edge molding put in our other house, with had a more "modern" flair. Our Eichler is more "rustic" so a square edge did not seem appropriate.

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Postby Jamal » Thu Sep 08, 2005 1:55 pm


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bitzala
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Postby bitzala » Thu Sep 08, 2005 10:47 pm


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Postby SDR » Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:39 pm

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molding

Postby paulsomm » Sun Sep 11, 2005 8:21 pm

We did a 3 1/2" x 3/4" birch molding in the whole house. We didn't have it milled, but we did have it laquered off site. In the sanding and finishing process the edge was inevitably softened. The offf site finish allowed a superior level of finish to be achieved w/o intrusion on the rest of our project.

Because of the thickness of our material there is some gapping between the molding and the floor. I suddenly understand the use of the quarter round in molding. It's size allows it to be shaped to the inevitable inconsistencies in the floor. We were initially annoyed by the "black line" in some places in our home but now we don't even see it.

Has anyone else run into this issue?

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Postby SDR » Sun Sep 11, 2005 9:31 pm

Quite right -- and an example of why "modern minimalism" can be more costly to achieve; to close your gap would have required shaping ("scribing") the bottom of the baseboard to the floor -- not impossible, just an extra step that would have been easily eliminated with the quarter-round "shoe" you mention.

I'm still glad you resisted that. . .

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Door Trim

Postby Krafty Gal » Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:14 pm

Hi There MCM lovers, If there is an existing thread for this I’ll be happy to move my post.

I had no idea I would lament so much over this little detail. Yikes.

Currently, none of my windows have trim and all of my doors have a simple 1 1/2 inch molding which are badly banged up. I would love to remove the trim from all of the doors, but there is a gap between the jamb and the drywall which will need to be addressed. Any ideas?

My sliding doors all have aluminum trim. One of which was replaced by a corner bead. Should I use a corner bead on all of them or add trim?

If anyone has any experience with this (preferably with pictures) I would love to see them. Thanks in advance!

See below pics.

Current door molding:
Image
Sliding Door Aluminum Trim:
Image
Sliding Door with Corner Bead:
Image

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Postby egads » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:18 pm

What you call corner bead is, to a drywall guy, L or J molding. I think they used the aluminum on a replacement slider that they did not remove the frame of. The other slider probably got new drywall. You could remove the door molding and install L against the jam, but it will need to be caulked. In my house the door jam is as thick as the wall and the drywall has J molding like your slider. In some MCM houses the jams are like yours (as thick as the walls) and a gap or reveal is left between the wallboard and the jam. But those were usually nice custom homes where special care was taken installing the doors and jams. There are a lot more drywall edge profiles available than what a typical Home Depot would have. I know I saw, in an old thread around here about base, a recess base made out of aluminum that was way cool. A lot of things are made for commercial use.

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Krafty Gal
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Postby Krafty Gal » Tue Jun 15, 2010 8:19 am

Thanks Egads, I saw the thread about the drywall reveal too. Anyone would be so fortunate to have something that cool.

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dani
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Postby dani » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:51 am

IT's REAL similar to ours, it may be original

all of our molding and trim is original and made from redwood. you can see a close up and far away in this photo. originally it was a opaque driftwood color but 2 owners ago was painted all white. Our baseboards originally had a shoe because of the parquet floors.

The base boards have a slight rounded top edge. the molding has a pretty square feel with a rounded inside edge. This is a techbuilt house, from what I have seen most techbuilt houses have a similar molding.


Image

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dani
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Postby dani » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:56 am

about that space you say you have..... I was looking at ours when I was taking these pictures, it seems our jams are wider than our drywall and studs. So we too would have a space if you were to lay a flat piece of wood on them. It looks as if all of our trim is notched to accommodate the jams. so it's thin at the jam and thick at the drywall if that makes sense.

arcadia sliders which have no trim and profile of our base trim
Image

Door trim pic/ with door shut.
Image

side view door trim
Image

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googieagog
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Postby googieagog » Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:22 pm

Nearly all architect-designed MCM houses I've seen use the square base. It looks very tailored but catches more dust & dings. For our place, on the early side (1950), not architect designed and a touch rustic, we went with rounded edge window stop. It was flexible enough that I could snug it to the floor without having to use quarter round, and the rounded edge sheds some dust (but not all).

Our windows and doors were originally trimless. Six of the windows and all the interior doors had been replaced, removed or reset over the years, with incorrect trim slapped up to cover the work. We were unable to find the type of plaster beads used back when the house was built. So we re-created the original look using drywall L-beads and a lot of patience, fitting & shimming.
Here's a photo of one jamb:


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googieagog
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Postby googieagog » Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:24 pm

Nearly all architect-designed MCM houses I've seen use the square base. It looks very tailored but catches more dust & dings. For our place, on the early side (1950), not architect designed and a touch rustic, we went with rounded edge window stop. It was flexible enough that I could snug it to the floor without having to use quarter round, and the rounded edge sheds some dust (but not all).

Our windows and doors were originally trimless. Six of the windows and all the interior doors had been replaced, removed or reset over the years, with incorrect trim slapped up to cover the work. We were unable to find the type of plaster beads used back when the house was built. So we re-created the original look using drywall L-beads and a lot of patience, fitting & shimming.
Here's a photo of one jamb:



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