Mid-Century TV Sets and Tube and Transistor Radios

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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Thu Nov 19, 2009 10:08 am

A friend of mine was telling me about those remotes: they emit a signal that goes to a small receiver that mechanically turns the tuner knob shaft from the inside. I have yet to use one for my set because I don't have it, but apparently you get the same very audible chunk-chunk-chunk sound as when you do it by hand. I kinda miss getting up to change the channel not to mention fine tuning the station and improvising antennas so I could watch TV in the garage, it just made it feel more interactive, or real to me.
Slim
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

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sky
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Postby sky » Thu Nov 19, 2009 12:49 pm

I remember discovering by accident that you could change a Zenith channel by clicking two silver dollars together. It was probably the space commander model - see photo below from Wikipedia - but I only had the two button remote. I remember that my grandparents had one with a three button remote, and I was envious of that, so it's a good thing that I didn't know then that there was a four button model.

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roadsidepictures
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Postby roadsidepictures » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:19 pm

My newest addition, 1957/8 Tom Thumb 6 transistor radio...

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:d: :cheers: :d:

KevinEP
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Postby KevinEP » Tue Mar 23, 2010 10:43 pm

http://www.theeastsiderla.com/2010/03/s ... l#comments

Storefront Report: Tuning into vintage stereos

Echo Park's retro retail scene - which includes vintage clothing stores, antique shops and vinyl record sellers - now includes Rewind: The Recycled Electronics Store. The chartreuse-colored storefront at 1041 Alvarado south of Sunset Boulevard features a line up of restored stereo and audio equipment - including a 1960s Fisher receiver with vacuum tubes and a 70s era Bose receiver and speakers -that were developed long before music lovers filled their homes with iPod docking stations.

Rewind is an outgrowth of a personal pursuit for store owner Oscar Carpinteyro, said his wife, Jennifer, who keeps the shop open during the day. "He would buy speakers and bring them home for his personal use," she said. About eight years ago, Oscar Carpinteyro opened an eBay store to sell restored and used equipment picked up at estate estate sales. But with the birth of the couple's second child, there was little space left in their Elysian Valley home for his burgeoning inventory. That lead Carpinteyro to lease a small Alvarado storefront, which once housed a long-time bridal shop where his wife had purchased her wedding dress 10 years ago. Rewind, which also repairs equipment and sells other audio accessories, has no website yet but it's open from 12 pm to 7 PM Monday - Saturday and from 12 PM - 5 PM on Sunday.

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classic form
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Postby classic form » Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:20 am

Anybody else do the vintage stereo thing?
Here's one of mine in a spare bedroom...

Sansui and Dynaco.

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STLModern
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Postby STLModern » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:17 pm

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Skylark
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Postby Skylark » Thu Mar 25, 2010 5:38 am

WOW! There is some great stuff on this thread! Some of those table top radios look familiar. :wink: We have some Philco Predictas as well, but rather than repeat what others have shared, here are a few different vintage television sets from our collection.

This is a 1948 RCA Victor 8TS30 tv set. The screen is about 9" diagonal. A table-top model for a REALLY sturdy table!
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Here's a Zenith from around 1950. The collectors call this type a "porthole." Not sure why! :? I got this from a couple who had two old Zenith sets, the other being one with the Space Command wireless remote. We only had enough room for one, so I chose this because of it's more "primitive" look. It did come with the original "Lazy Bones" wired remote control, which is nice.
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And this is a Christmas card from a few years ago, featuring our 1956 RCA CTC-5 COLOR television. We based the style of the card on various magazine ads for RCA "Big Color" from the mid-century.
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All the tv sets work, some better than others. All could use a little work, but the great thing is how cool these gizmos (all those on this thread) without even being turned on! 8-)

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sky
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Postby sky » Thu Mar 25, 2010 7:07 am

Didn't think of this before, but I have these photos from museums I've been to:

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Not very good photos, though, but please don't shoot the photographer.

tomb
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Postby tomb » Tue Apr 27, 2010 2:11 pm

I just picked this up today, its my first foray into "vintage electronics".
As far as I can tell, its a 1965 Voice of Music "V-M" record changer. Model 1285.

It had a pretty good hum when i plugged it in and turned it on. So i turned it off right away and unplugged it. Advice?

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I think (hope) it will clean up nice, did i make a good $20 investment?

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wwilber
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Postby wwilber » Tue Apr 27, 2010 2:40 pm

The hum is a result of faulty capacitors in the tube amp. This can be fixed - and there is a lot of info to be found on how to do it. Anyone who services vintage radios or amps should be able to do the repairs for you. There is also a great resource for VM phonographs and parts here

VM had their record players and changers in a lot of other popular brands units, and they are a pretty reliable system. In case you didn't know already, that little button in between the volume and tone knobs can be pushed in half way to turn the unit on, and then fully pushed to start the change cycle. It's a nice feature so you don't have to open the lid as much.

Good luck with getting it up and running!!
My neighborhood:

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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:56 am

That's your filter capacitors making that hum; it's called a "60-cycle-hum". It happens when you have leakage inside the cap itself. If you continued to play your machine, there's a chance of the cap exploding; I've never had it happen, but have been told by the old-timers, that it sounds, and does as much damage as a shotgun blast: BOOOOOOOOOOOOM! If you want to do the work yourself, it's really not hard; PM me and I can pretty much walk you through it... I can tell you exactly which ones you're pulling too. If you remove the chassis, you'll see what looks like either big paper, or metal shotgun shells:

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Here's a brief tutorial, please read it. It's not as scary as you'd think to do the work, really!!!!!!!!!!! If you can do this, you have bragging rights, and get to be in "the club" of "he-man I can do anything, just step aside..." All that high-voltage can be very intimidating, but as long as you have respect for it, it's not bad.
Don't try to buy one that looks just like it, you'll learn more if you use multiple capacitors "tied" together at the ground, hugh?!?!?!? Just read the tutorial, you'll understand, remember, it's part of being in "the club"
I started out where you did, and I can now service my won tube TV's, yeah baby!
Slim
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

tomb
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Postby tomb » Wed Apr 28, 2010 6:33 pm


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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Thu Apr 29, 2010 9:23 am

Opps! Okay, here ya go, sorry:

http://www.justradios.com/captips.html

BTW, you can get a schematic for your player here too, and if I recall correctly, they will make you a set of caps that you essentially just solder in. I don't think there are too many either, maybe six, so if they don't, it won't be hard to just do it yourself. If you learn to read caps, you can just flip the sucker over, read 'em, write 'em down, order 'em then just solder 'em in. You'll see something like this sample:

.005@600 ( this will be on the side of capacitor)

is the same as,

.005 MFD at 600 VDC

is the same as,

.005uF @ 600 Volts

is the same as,

.005 microfarad, at 600 volts of direct current

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DON'T CUT THEM ALL OUT AND TRY TO REMEMBER WHERE THEY GO! Do them one-at-a-time...
Slim
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!


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