Sanford Kent's Teriton Apts Landmark Upheld!

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Sanford Kent's Teriton Apts Landmark Upheld!

Postby LVS » Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:21 pm

The city of Santa Monica has recognized the Teriton Apartments as the finest example of International Style Architecture in the city, and It exemplifies, symbolizes, or manifests elements of the cultural, social, economic, political or architectural history of the City.

An appeal by the owner to overturn the Landmark status is at, June 12th 2005, 6:45 pm, Santa Monica City Hall Council Chambers, 1685 Main St., Santa Monica. Please come, Santa Monica really appreciates having the public’s opinion heard. At this meeting we will be asking for the Landmark Status to be upheld.

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Start of old post:
We are trying to save the Teriton apartments at 130 San Vicente, Santa Monica, 90402, a 28 unit Modern building built in 1949. Its site plan mimics the pinwheel design of the 1925 Bauhaus building in Desau. A developer wants to buy the building, tear it down and replace it with about 24 condos. (Now changed to 48 condos, opps... I ment synagogue with 48 suites) a The current owners, known for developing historic sites, are pleading ignorance of the whole thing.

It is a completely intact building with a garden courtyard, corner windows, roof gardens, finned rooflines, planters over the entrances and detached garages. The whole thing shows strong influences of Le Corbusier’s Pessac Workers’ Housing of 1929. It would be an embarrassment to lose this place because there are so few intact building of the period left in this area. Santa Monica has only one post-war Landmark Status building, the Sears Main Building at 3rd and Colorado Boulevard, designed by Rowland Crawford in 1947. The next landmarked building is Santa Monica’s Civic Auditorium build in 1958 by Welton Becket.

We had our first hearing Monday Nov. 14th 2005 with the City’s: Landmark Commission. With only a weekend to prepare (the owners put up the demolition sign the Friday before the Commission met) we were still able to convince the Commission the building needed further study, they gave us only an extra 30 days to gather and present more material authenticating its Landmark status.

The architect was Sanford Kent AIA, born Oct. 10, 1918. He also designed Jan’s Restaurant on Beverly, 1957, the Westvale Apts in Westwood on Midvale and Ophir and his own home in 1949 which we are trying to locate. Also is there a Silverlake home by Kent under restoration?.

Any information on him would be helpful as well as any information on the Teriton who’s first owner was, Edgar Hillman who named the building after his daughters Toni and Teri.

The Teriton is located at 130 San Vicente Blvd., just past Ocean Ave., in Santa Monica. 90402. A tour is possible upon request to all supporters.
Last edited by LVS on Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:30 am, edited 13 times in total.

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November 23, 2005

Postby Lynxwiler » Wed Nov 23, 2005 11:02 am

Landmarks Board Stays Demolition Of Teriton Complex

Lynne Bronstein, Santa Monica Mirror contributing writer

An impassioned appeal by tenants of a 1950s-vintage apartment complex prompted the Landmarks Commission at Monday night’s meeting to ask for further information on the building, which was on the list of properties slated for demolition.

The property at 130-140 San Vicente Boulevard, known as the Teriton Apartments, was constructed in 1949 as a three-story multi-family residence. Designed in the Modern Vernacular style by architect Sanford Kent, its characteristics include its U shape, a central courtyard, rounded corners, and louvers above the entranceways.

A contractor acting as a spokesperson for the owner (who is listed in materials handed out by the tenants as simply Teriton Apts, with a Los Angeles address), told the Landmarks Commission that the building had “structural problems and access problems.â€￾ He quoted the owners as saying that the building had no architectural significance and was merely a “box-shaped building,â€￾ and that it had sustained considerable damage in the 1994 earthquake and was “not up to code.â€￾ In answer to a question from a Commission member, he admitted that he did not know how long the current owners have owned the Teriton.

Eight tenants and neighbors of the Teriton spoke to the Commission and presented evidence that the complex is in excellent condition, has historic significance, is part of a potential historic district, and is the envy of visitors.

Tenant Dwayne Howard, who helped prepare much of the information about the Teriton contained in a packet handed to Commission members, said of the property: “My lifelong passion for architecture and design and my involvement with historic preservation are the very reasons I call the Teriton home.â€￾ He refuted the owners’ claim that the building is in a deteriorated condition: “It is without a doubt one of the finest buildings from this period still intact.â€￾ He also noted that the tenants really don’t know who the present owner is.

Tenant Virginia Sharpe also confirmed that the tenants aren’t sure of the identity of the building’s owner. “I pay my rent to ‘Teriton Investors,’ â€￾ she said. As for the “significant structural damageâ€￾ cited by the owners, she retorted: “If there is [damage], none of us have been informed about it.â€￾

Tenants were also dismayed that a notice of demolition, dated October 27, was posted in front of the building on November 10, four days before the scheduled Landmarks Commission meeting, and that the sign was removed a few hours later, leading some tenants to assume that the demo permit had been withdrawn. Only after someone made a phone call to the City was the demolition application verified and the sign re-posted. Despite the suddenness of the announcement, tenants scurried to collect data on their residence, in order to make a presentation before the Commission.

The packet presented to the Commission included a detailed description of the architectural characteristics and amenities of the Teriton, a review of the work of its architect, Sanford Kent, “ a local master of the Modern style,â€￾ who was apparently influenced by European Modernists, such as Walter Gropius and Mies Van Der Rohe, mention of other historic buildings in the northwest area on San Vicente Boulevard, mention of noted personalities connected with the building (Mickey Spillane lived there) and a petition signed by nineteen tenants and neighbors.

The Commission concluded that the tenants had made a good case for postponement of the demolition and requested that City Staff look into the matter for a future hearing.

A multi-unit dwelling at 941-943 11th Street was also given a stay of demolition as the Commission voted in favor of an application for landmark designation. The owner admitted that the Spanish-style house had “charmâ€￾ but that he believed buildings had a “life cycleâ€￾ and that this building, which he had inherited from his parents, had outlasted its time. The Commission, however, felt that there were many characteristics of the building that were unique in structures of this style and that some effort must be made to save some of them.

In other actions, the Commission filed for application for landmark designation of a eucalyptus tree at 1407 Hill Street. The owners of the property on which the tree stands were commended for being in favor of designation and for their stewardship of the tree.

The Commission also designated a multi-family residential building at 1143 11th Street, over the protests of the owner, Alan Lazarus, who said that landmark status for the building would be a “hardship situationâ€￾ for him, as he wanted to develop the property as he saw fit. Commission members discussed the design elements of the building that impressed them and made some careful revisions to the language of the certificate, citing the primary façade as the main element and the interior façade as a secondary element.

In other business, the Commission approved a revision to a Certificate of Appropriateness for the demolition of a garage and replacement with a new garage at the rear of the property at 2612 3rd Street. The original C of A was approved on October 11, 2004. Also approved were the revision of a Statement of Official Action (STOA), correcting a clerical error for the designation of the Spanish Colonial Revival style office building at 710 Wilshire Boulevard, and a STOA designating the Phillips Chapel at 2001 4th Street as a landmark.

No action was taken on the following demolition permits: 717 12th Street; 3015 Goldsmith Street; 1311-15 Centinela Avenue; 943-945 16th Street; 2655 33rd Street; 435 Palisades Avenue; 859 Woodacres Road; 228 15th Street; 533 23rd Street; 2324 Idaho Avenue; and 1228 San Vicente Boulevard.

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Postby Tony » Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:15 pm

Unfortunately, I now nothing about Kent except that he did work in partnership with an architect named Jack Charney. And Charney had a really nice house in Trousdale Estates.

I have been successful in locating addresses through the use of period phone books. I would suggest that someone go to the Beverly Hills library and look at early 1950's phone books for Kent's name. If you find an address for him, then walk across the street to City Hall. Visit the Planning Department and look at the building permits for that address. If Kent's name is on it, then you've got it. Of course, the house may have been demolished by now.

You can do the same thing in Santa Monica. The Library has old phone books. And it's really easy to look up building permits at City Hall. They are all computerized.

The City of Los Angeles is more difficult. The early phone books are only on microfiche. These are hard to read (at least with my eyes), and you have to look at multiple areas for complete coverage. If you find an address then you have to drive to Building and Planning and have them look up the permits. This can require some waiting time.

I'd suggest starting in Beverly Hills.

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Postby nichols » Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:34 pm

SANFORD KENT

Born: 10 Oct 1918 (Portland, OR)
Died: 11 Aug 1997 (San Ysidro, CA)

1910 Hillsboro Ave. (1956)
1115 S. La Cienega Blvd. (1962)
1421 S. Crest Drive (Home - 1965)

Joined American Institute of Architects in 1946

Education: Univ. of Calif. (Berkeley) 1936-37 - USC 1938-1941

Employment: Kistner, Curtis & Wright 1943
Gilmore & Varney, 1943
Maurice A. Fleishman 1944-46
Col. (umbia?) Motion picture studios (1946)
Own firm Sanford Kent, AIA 1946-56
Charney-Kent & Assoc. 1956-61


Selected Works:
7-unit apartment building Beverly Glen, 1949
Kent residence, 1949
Al Eben residence Brentwood-Westwood, 1950
Fullerton Crest homes, Fullerton, 1955
Guss restaurant, West L.A, 1956
Jan's Restaurant, 1957
Heller Machinery, 7039 Slauson, 1957
Halukani Apartments, 2119 Beachwood Dr., 1957
Stat's Restaurant, Eastland, West Covina, 1957
Eldon Industries, Inc. Hawthorne, 1957
Morris Guss Residence (related to restaurant?) 1958
Alfred T. Wilkes Residence, 1958
Grossman residence, Beverly Hills, 1960
Milani Foods, West L.A., 1960
Robert Silverstein Residence, Beverly Hills, 1961
San Francisco Joe's Restaurant, La Cienega Bl., B.H., 1965


MERGED with Jerome Tamen, Sheldon Steinhauer to form KTS Architects in 1973 - Added Richard N. Rice later that year to become KRTS Architects.
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Postby nichols » Wed Nov 23, 2005 8:38 pm

LOOK! his later partner Richard N. Rice is still practicing in Simi Valley.

http://www.jurispro.com/mem/richardrice/

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Postby PlanetGlass » Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:53 am

Weird: "Alfred T. Wilkes Residence, 1958".

That is the architect who designed my (1954 MCM) house! So Kent designed a house for another practicing architect - wonder how often that happens?

Laura

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Postby Tony » Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:42 pm

PlanetGlass,

It is rare, but some architects have had other architects design their homes. In Palm Springs, for example, William F. Cody designed a house for his architect-brother John Cody.

I think this happens mostly in to instances. First, when the client-architect is just too busy to design his own house. Rather like the parable of the shoemakers children being barefoot. The other instance is when the client-architect's area of expertise is outside of the residential area. Commercial or institutional architects, for example.

It would be interesting to find more of this type.

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Sanford Kent house?

Postby LVS » Sat Dec 03, 2005 12:43 am

Laura

Is it possible to get photo of your house by Kent, or better yet, a tour? to help us with the research.

Louis
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One Small Victory and Photos of The Teriton

Postby LVS » Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:10 am

Dear Friends

Currently we have had a reprieve; they took the notice of application for demolition sign down. Yes, we are happy.

The sign posted prominently on the front lawn disappear as quietly as it first appeared. With no explanation from the owners of the Teriton Apartments. I called the city they told me that application is withdrawn.

We are confident we are still a target of development and plan to continue researching the Architect Sanford Kent, and will persist to seek Landmark status with the City of Santa Monica and Nation Registration. If any one has any more information, please let me know.

Thanks,

Louis Scaduto

Please check out the link below

http://photos.yahoo.com/TheTeriton

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Postby SDR » Sat Dec 03, 2005 11:01 am

Wow -- lovely courtyard, among other things !

The canted "balcony" detail reminds me of a similar design, in different materials, here in San Francisco.

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/sdrdesign ... 82&.src=ph

Glad to hear the "wake-up call" has been successful, so far. Keep plugging.

SDR
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Postby PlanetGlass » Sun Dec 04, 2005 8:51 pm

Louis, I'm happy to show you my house. I don't have good photos of it, but can probably snap a few if you can't come to glendale. If you send me a private message I'll send you my phone number.

Laura

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Action Needed in Santa Monica 11-13-06 7pm

Postby LVS » Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:31 pm

In the last year a lot of things have happened to the Teriton apartments designed by Sanford Kent AIA. It has become ground zero for the preservation of Landmark buildings. The new owners who purchased the building after the land-marking process started, claimed that the building is now part of a religious organization and is protected from local jurisdiction. By using a little known loophole in a law meant to help religious groups rebuild their buildings after an earthquake, the owners are about to make land-marking any building in the State of California impossible. In addition, if that was not enough, they seemed to be thinking that will be exempt from all local zoning laws too.

At least that is my take on it. You check out some other viewpoints at:

http://www.smmirror.com/MainPages/Displ ... p?eid=3852
http://www.riprense.com/Teriton_Apts.htm
http://www.jewishjournal.com/home/preview.php?id=16692

For me this process has been an interesting journey that has helped me rediscover just how passionate I am about architecture and also surprised me that with little teaching you could instill a lot of pride in your neighbors for buildings that we had taken for granted.

I am still asking for more information on this very interesting architect, Sanford Kent who seems to have just disappeared in the 1970s. And Also the address for the Japanese inspired Robert Silverstein Residence, Beverly Hills, 1961 and Morris Guss Home 1958 he design.

We need your help this Monday night at 7pm at Santa Monica City Hall Chambers to speak on behalf of the Teriton apartment and Sanford Kent AIA.
thank you for reading the post.

Louis Scaduto, Architect

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Another Teriton Tenant viewpoint

Postby LVS » Sat Nov 11, 2006 4:05 pm

I love the spaciousness of my apartment and the graceful courtyard. It isn’t a fancy building, but that is one of the things I like about it. Sanford Kent designed it to take advantage of the site and if the ugly towers hadn’t been built, there would be a view of Inspiration Point and the coast. Maybe it doesn’t seem like it now, but it had a lot of small luxuries, such as good heating, garages, lots of electric outlets, garbage disposal, masses of closet/storage space, back door and front door, laundry room and, of course, the ocean breezes. The building has permitted privacy and yet is safe because there is always someone to see the comings and goings. Santa Monica has changed radically in the years since I moved here, in 1974, (lost my first apartment to developers) and the places being built now are poorly built, small and hideously expensive.

The new owners filed suit in Federal Court against the Landmarks Commission and City Council. We will know on Monday whether the building is landmarked. If the owners win in court, it will affect not only us but many other tenants in California, may the whole country.

I have spent quite a bit of time in Italy and while it seems kind of crazy to landmark a 56 year old building when Europeans live in centuries old homes, it was part of the hope for the future when the building went up after World War II.


Bryna Skuro

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Teriton Apartments as a gateway

Postby LVS » Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:43 pm

The Teriton’s location, as the gateway building to a potential historic district along San Vicente Bl. cannot be argued. It is where it is -- perched atop a slight rise as one rounds the curve from the ocean heading east. When people ask me where I live and I tell them, the response is always the same, “Oh, I know that building.â€￾ People who live in Santa Monica know this building!

We know that in 1949, when the Teriton was built, the Evening Outlook identified this location as “one of the finest, income property sites overlooking the ocean in the City.â€￾ It is still that same site and it is the first thing you see as you drive around the curve from Ocean Ave. to San Vicente Bl. The elements of Modern Style design that Sanford Kent took such pains to create and its massing, height, proportion and set back. The expansive lawn serves to lead the eye from the park area of the median strip up to the building’s facade.

The structure itself, because of its serpentine footprint, gives the impression of two buildings when viewed from the street rather than one, always an unexpected and delightful surprise to visitors of the building. Its stark, unadorned façade, clearly reminiscent of the International influence on Modern architectural design, causes the appreciative viewer to look back in time and applaud a style that is now enjoying a resurgence in many circles.

Posted by LVS for Another Teriton Tenant

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Postby Vavala » Fri Nov 17, 2006 4:30 pm

Teriton is Landmarked
By Lynne Bronstein
Mirror Staff Writer

Santa Monica Mirror
November 16-22, 2006

Going against both the advisement of a City staff report and a warning from a representative from the property owner, the Santa Monica Landmarks Commission voted unanimously at its November 13 meeting to designate the Teriton Apartments, 130-142 San Vicente Blvd., as a City Landmark.

The Commission chose to disregard a lengthy memorandum from the City’s historic resources consultant, PCR Services Corporation, which found the multi-family garden apartment complex didn’t meet any of the six criteria for landmark designation. The report mentioned the building’s unusual layout, a modified U-shaped “footprintâ€￾; its architect, Sanford Kent; its appearance as an example of the vernacular Modern style; its former tenants, who included criminologist Dr. Marcel V. Frym and, according to the testimony of several tenants, crime writer Mickey Spillane; and its location at the western end of San Vicente Blvd., but concluded that none of these characteristics were noteworthy enough to qualify the building for designation.

Commissioner Ruthann Lehrer echoed the comments made by of some of the Teriton’s residents, saying, “I too was very disappointed [with the PCR report]. It was a rehash of what we had before [the preliminary City staff report of the September 11 meeting]. The analysis was very superficial.

â€￾Mention was made by a parade of speakers – most of whom were residents of the Teriton – of the building’s aesthetics, its location, which makes it a “gatewayâ€￾ building where San Vicente meets the ocean, the functionality of its design and the way the apartments feel like private residences within a community created by the courtyard plan.

The Commission moved to designate the Teriton under Criteria 1 (“elements of the cultural, social, economic, political or architectural history of the Cityâ€￾); 2 (“aesthetic or artistic interest or valueâ€￾); 4 (“architectural characteristicsâ€￾); 5 (“work of a notable architect or builderâ€￾); and 6 (“established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhoodâ€￾).

Not enough evidence could be found to support Criteria 3 (“identified with historic personages or with important events in local, state or national historyâ€￾).

A representative for the owner, Or Khaim Hashalom, a nonprofit Jewish organization, warned the Commissioners that designation would be an “illegalâ€￾ act “because ownership of a property by a religious organization is protected from designation under government code Section 37361. The representative said that a lawsuit had been filed against the City of Santa Monica regarding the Teriton being nominated for designation and that an order had been filed in Federal Court to halt the proceedings of the Landmarks Commission. City Land Use Attorney Barry Rosenbaum said that the Federal Court had rejected the owner’s attempt to block the meeting.

In other actions, the Commission announced that the demolition permit for the one-story building at 2001-2011 Main Street that houses the Horizons West surf shop and Zephyr skateboard shop had been withdrawn, as the owner wants to pursue more research into the historic significance of the shops.

A single-family residence at 908 California Avenue, slated for demolition, was given a continuance pending more information on the building’s history and style.

The Commission also approved Statements of Official Action for the new lighting and design elements on the Santa Monica Pier, for landscaping plans and materials and color selection for the former Marion Davies Estate at 415 Pacific Coast Highway and for designating a multi-family property at 423-431 Ocean Avenue.

No action was taken on the following proposed demolitions: 1702 San Vicente Blvd.; 935 25th St.; 424 16th St.; 1312 Lincoln Blvd.; 1036 22nd St.; 711 Colorado Ave.; 1514 7th St.; 2029 Olympic Blvd.; 1038 11th St.

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Postby Vavala » Thu May 03, 2007 6:05 pm

The landmark designation of the Teriton Apartments is being appealed by the owners of the property. City Council will be hearing this item at their meeting on Tuesday, May 8th. The May staff report on the property recommends that City Council deny the appeal and designate the property as a landmark.

http://www.smgov.net/cityclerk/council/ ... 0806-A.htm

From the appeal analysis of the staff report:

“Determination of historic significance is not an exact science and it is not unusual for preservation experts to disagree, particularly in the evaluation of modern resources, whose history and value have not yet been conclusively determined.

“Based on the research and information gathered prior to the designation hearing, staff initially recommended that the Landmarks Commission deny this designation. However, based on the full record to date, including testimony and documentary evidence presented at the November 13, 2006 public hearing, staff now believes that there is ample support for the first two designation criteria and therefore now recommends that the designation be upheld.â€￾

This recommendation is noteworthy, for it shows the Santa Monica Planning Staff’s growing knowledge and understanding of the significance of resources from the recent past.

The Modern Committee will be going on record at the May 8th Council meeting, advocating in support of landmark designation of the Teriton Apartments.

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Postby Vavala » Thu May 03, 2007 6:11 pm

May 3, 2007

City Council
City of Santa Monica
City Council Chambers
1685 Main Street, Room 213
Santa Monica, CA 90401

Honorable Mayor Bloom and City Councilmembers:

The Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee urges the Santa Monica City Council to deny the appeal and uphold the designation of the Teriton Apartments, 130-142 San Vicente Boulevard, as a landmark and the real property as a landmark parcel.

The Teriton exhibits a degree of masterful planning indicative of architect Stanford Kent’s approach to create a livable design for affordable rental housing. The use of a pinwheel-shaped plan for the apartments is a characteristic of Kent’s work and serves as a design solution for providing the various apartments with equal amounts of semi-private courtyard space plus light and ventilation from exterior exposures. The significance of this design was improperly dismissed by the PCR Services assessment report issued in November 2006. It is a design feature that was seldom used and makes the Teriton particularly valuable to a study of the various spatial concepts employed in multifamily housing design. Architecturally, the vernacular Modern style of the Teriton is purposefully spare in its treatment and reflects the broader influence and appeal of the Modern movement which was gaining popularity at the time. Several elements of the building’s design, including the flat roof, stucco finish, metal-framed casement windows and wide soffits to shield the sun, serve as character-defining features.

The Teriton Apartments are a notable example in Santa Monica of multifamily residential housing developed in the post war era and have been found to meet criteria 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 from the City’s historic preservation ordinance, as declared by the Landmarks Commission. The Modern Committee strongly supports this designation and we find the Teriton to be significant for its unique, pinwheel-shaped site plan, its integrity as an example of the vernacular Modern style as applied to garden apartments, its design by local architect Stanford Kent and its association with the development trends of the post war era in which the need for affordable housing transformed Santa Monica into a more urbanized city. We strongly urge Council to uphold the Landmarks Commission’s designation of the Teriton and deny the appeal.

The Los Angeles Conservancy is the largest local historic preservation organization in the United States, with over 8,000 members throughout the Los Angeles area. Established in 1978, the Conservancy works to preserve and revitalize the significant architectural heritage of Los Angeles, and has a very active, volunteer-driven Modern Committee which has worked successfully to raise awareness about Los Angeles' unique collection of significant mid-20th-century Modernist structures that shaped the tastes and architectural trends of the entire nation.

Sincerely,

Marcello Vavala
Residential Council Chair
Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee

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Teriton Hearing June 12th Please come

Postby LVS » Sat May 05, 2007 11:25 am

Developers are appealing the Landmark designation of historic “The Teriton Apartmentsâ€￾ at 130-142 San Vicente Blvd., they hope to build 22 private condos and private temple.

Hearing place: June 12 6:45pm Santa Monica Council, City Hall, 1685 Main St., Santa Monica.

Please come, Santa Monica really appreciates having the public’s opinion heard. At this meeting we will be asking for the Landmark Status to be upheld.

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Teriton is Landmarked! unanimous vote by SM City Council

Postby LVS » Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:25 am

Teriton is Landmarked! unanimous vote by SM City Council

June 12th 2007

Thanks Marcello Vavala we could not have done it without all your smart actions, and the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee support.

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Re: Teriton is Landmarked! unanimous vote by SM City Council

Postby Synthetrix » Mon Jun 18, 2007 8:14 am

LVS wrote:Teriton is Landmarked! unanimous vote by SM City Council

June 12th 2007

Thanks Marcello Vavala we could not have done it without all your smart actions, and the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee support.


That's great news Lou!
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Postby nichols » Mon Dec 29, 2008 9:38 am

JEWISH JOURNAL

December 25, 2008
Teriton tenants win battle to stay in historic apartment complex

By Jane Ulman


After a three-year battle with alleged religious nonprofit Or Khaim Hashalom, tenants of the historic 28-unit Teriton Apartments in Santa Monica have won the right to remain in or return to their apartments for up to seven years under their former rent-controlled leases, according to a settlement made public Dec. 4...

http://www.jewishjournal.com/los_angele ... :20:52:57Z

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Postby nichols » Wed Dec 01, 2010 11:33 am

SANTA MONICA DAILY PRESS

Jewish group loses appeal in dispute over landmarked property
By Nick Taborek


December 01, 2010
SAN VICENTE BLVD — A state appellate court has rejected an appeal from a Jewish group that for five years has sought to demolish a seaside Santa Monica apartment complex, claiming it should be entitled to an exemption from historic preservation laws...

http://www.smdp.com/Articles-c-2010-11- ... perty.html


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