1958 Paul Rudolph School in FL threatened

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1958 Paul Rudolph School in FL threatened

Postby nichols » Thu Apr 27, 2006 3:19 pm

Sarasota Plans to Demolish Paul Rudolph School

Story by Margaret Foster / Apr. 20, 2006


The Sarasota County school board has decided to raze Riverview High School, the first public building by Paul Rudolph, father of the Sarasota school of architecture. (Tim Ross)


A 48-year-old Florida high school designed by modern architect Paul Rudolph could be torn down for a parking lot.

Riverview High School, located in Sarasota, Fla., was the first important commercial building designed by Rudolph (1918-1997), the father of the Sarasota school of architecture. Owned by the Sarasota County school board, the steel-frame structure's concrete sunshades were removed years ago, and the flat roof was replaced with a metal hip one...

http://www.nationaltrust.org/magazine/a ... 042006.htm

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Postby MD² » Fri Apr 28, 2006 12:13 am

Thanks for the "heads-up" nichols, but THIS IS TERRIBLE NEWS!

Is there anyone we can write to about this?

Under these circumstances, I hope Mr. King won't mind me posting the following.
This is from his great 2002 book about Rudolph's work in Florida: Paul Rudolph - The Florida Houses.

If your like Paul Rudolph's work, the 2 books set published by the Princeton Architectural Press in 2002-3 is a must.

Christopher Domin & Joseph King wrote:Riverview High School is Rudolph's first major public project completed in Florida. To create an intense environment for learning, Rudolph chose the inward-focused courtyard prototype as a way to density this rural site, offering an approximation of urbanism within an open field. This two-story composition, organized around a central public space, is enclosed to the north and south by classroom blocks, a cafeteria and library block to the west, and a skeletal steel colonnade with shade canopies to the east. A sky-lit gymnasium and auditorium are placed south of the courtyard. and two single-story buildings, containing the administrative offices and medical clinic, are nestled along the western edge of the courtyard. A steel frame with single wythe brick infill is an unusual detail among Rudolph's generally ephemeral Florida work. The thin verticality of the black frame was meant to evoke the dark slender trunks of the southern yellow pines that are numerous on the site. The choice of brick and steel as the primary materials in this symmetrically disposed composition is certainly reminiscent of the work of Mies van der Rohe in Chicago, but is modulated and honed for its specific context.
As with most of Rudolph's projects in Florida, this composition is arranged and detailed to encourage air movement and mediate the intensity of the sun. A series of staggered precast concrete sunshades dominates the facades of the classroom buildings in an attempt to protect the large sliding glass doors and operable windows from direct solar gain. The climactically responsive theme is continued into the interior corridor system with a series of ventilated steel-and-glass monitors rising above the roof. Considered in section, the semi-enclosed interior circulation is carefully composed to allow light and air to penetrate through the stacked corridors. This project came into existence primarily through the largess of Philip Hiss, Rudolph's most avid patron in Florida, who was also chairman of the Sarasota school board during this time.

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Windows Live Local "Virtual Earth" view


Here are some published articles about the planned demolition:

February 5th, 2006 HeraldTribune.com wrote:Razing Rudolph
The next 'Sarasota school' modern building set to be demolished is one of architect Paul Rudolph's best-known: Riverview High.
BY ANASTASIA BOWEN

One of the most important buildings of the "Sarasota school" of architecture, the regional adaptation of mid-century modernism, is Riverview High School. It's significant as the first public building in Florida by the undisputed leading architect of the Sarasota school, Paul Rudolph.
Now, the structure, built in 1958, is slated for demolition.
The legendary Rudolph practiced in Sarasota from 1941 to 1958, and later became dean of architecture at Yale University, before establishing his own practice in New York. His design of Riverview High School is considered to be one of the most progressive school buildings of its day. A modern steel, glass and brick design, with large concrete sunshades, blends the building with the surrounding pine trees and integrated it with the climate through use of natural ventilation and daylighting.
"There was a great deal of interest in natural ventilation, which is what the design is predicated on," explains Bert Brosmith, the architect overseeing Rudolph's Florida office during the construction of Riverview. "The elevated areas over the walkways permitted air to come down through the glass in the walkways and through the glass in the outside wall. That was the idea. In those days it seemed to work."
Those strategies of using natural light and ventilation are making a strong comeback in construction today, because of rising energy costs and the movement to more "green" buildings.
The iconic structure at Riverview will instead be discarded. In its place will be surface parking, according to the site plan prepared for the Sarasota County School Board.
Through the years, Riverview has aged gracefully, although not without hardship. Air conditioning was not readily available at the time it was built; it was retrofitted into the building several years later. This is one of the biggest complaints by school officials about the building.
"The air-conditioning was added later, so there are some structural challenges with the building that does not lend itself to a complete remodel," said Dr. Carol Todd, chair of the Sarasota County School Board.
Brosmith can identify with that problem.
"I certainly understand the lack of air-conditioning because there was not much air-conditioning done in those days," said Brosmith, from his office in New York. "The incorporation of air-conditioning into buildings that never were initially air-conditioned gets to be a pretty abortive kind of thing."
Timothy M. Rohan, assistant professor of art history at University of Massachusetts in Amherst, who wrote his dissertation on Rudolph while receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard University, thinks there may be other answers.
"If you just turn to the conventional solutions, it's going to be difficult," said Rohan. "And those might not be the most inexpensive solutions either, going by the book."
Bob Earley, associate superintendent and chief financial and business officer for the school district said the district feels that saving the Rudolph building is not possible. But the demolition of the Rudolph structure was "not a decision quickly arrived at," he said.
"The way they group kids for instruction and use technology is very different today," said Earley.
"I'm not one to be critical of the design," he said. "In 1958, it was very innovative."
He said the three biggest issues surrounding the existing building are its maintenance, function and security.
Brosmith is surprised that maintenance is cited as a problem.
"It's a steel-frame building and I don't know the maintenance quality that's been done over the last 30-some-odd years," said Brosmith. But, "it was fairly substantially put together."
"We've had countless people go through there, looking at the facility, and giving us their assessment as to what direction we should go," said Earley.
Although he does not have "a spreadsheet that shows two columns: what it would cost to renovate and what it would cost to rebuild," he said. "Our sense is that we can't renovate the building."
BMK Architects was the firm retained by the school board that worked on the assessment about five years ago.
"The report was a study of 'what is the condition of the existing school,' and it went through all of the deficiencies, how its not up to code," explains Darrell McLain, principal of BMK Architects. "The school board had a choice of renovating this school and then building new additions around what's there, or tearing it down and building a new school as it should be, to meet all of the current codes and the current theory of teaching."
If the building were renovated, according to McLain, "when you get done with it, you may have a little piece maybe. It would never look like what Paul Rudolph designed, and it wouldn't work for 3,000 students."
He said the security issues surrounding new schools are a big issue as well.
"It's our current environment that exists in 2006 that you and I live in," he said, "didn't exist when this thing was built."
He personally feels, though, that the architecture is significant.
"I think that the building in its time was an architectural achievement. I think you certainly need to document the historic part of the building," said McLain. "I don't think you just go in there and tear it down."
"I went to Montana State and graduated in '73. I remember studying Paul Rudolph," he said. "Who would've thought I'd be out here ... working on one his buildings, much less going to have to tear it down."
Some of the historic schools in the district, though not uniquely "Sarasota school" like Riverview, have been preserved. Most notably, Bay Haven and Southside elementary schools, both replicas of Italian and Spanish Renaissance architecture, have been restored. And more recently, the Collegiate-Gothic Revival style Sarasota High School was saved and will be reused as a visual arts education center and contemporary art museum, through a joint effort of The Ringling School of Art and Design and the Sarasota Museum of Art.
"As a district, we are faced with a number of different challenges," said Todd. "One challenge is how to preserve the assets the district has, and the other challenge is how to maximize the dollars that we put into the classroom for the benefit of children and for the children's education.
"And the district has worked very hard over the years, since I have been on the board, to preserve those assets," she said.
Todd thinks that a community's built history is an important part of educating new generations of students.
"I fought for Sarasota High School, to preserve that," she said. "Whenever it's feasibly possible, its something we have to do. Because if we don't give children the past, then what do we have to give them?"
Raising the bar in architecture was the directive during the 1950s under the visionary chair of the Sarasota school board, Philip Hiss. During his tenure, 10 new school projects were built, each rethinking the outdated model of school instruction and design while carefully considering Florida's environment. The largest project awarded during Hiss' tenure was Riverview, as Rudolph was Hiss' personal favorite of the architects.
John Howey, FAIA, an architect in Tampa and the author of "The Sarasota School of Architecture," thinks this of the equation needs to be addressed.
"Phil Hiss was the one who initiated the big revolution in public schools, which got international attention, and this was one of those schools that did," said Howey. "I think for that reason alone it should be restored."
Not historically registered
Riverview High School does not have landmark status and is not registered on the National Register of Historic Places. But it could be.
"The designation program on the county level is a voluntary, owner-initiated process," said Lorrie Muldowney, historic preservation specialist for the Sarasota County History Center. "The school board hasn't stepped forward to designate it."
Over the past couple of years, the county and the school board created an agreement that addressed many things, with one aspect of the agreement allowing the county a chance to review plans for new schools. Historical buildings are now a part of that equation.
"In the past, when these projects have involved significant historical resources, we have said that a cultural resource assessment survey should be completed," said Muldowney. "And in the past that's not been done simply because it is a recommendation."
Muldowney, who is a Riverview alumnus and a graduate of the University of Florida with a master's of science in architectural studies, wrote her thesis on the Sarasota school of architecture. Muldowney's focus was specifically on the schools. She considers the Riverview to be a significant resource of the community.
"We are all aware of the changes the building has undergone over the years, but it still has what was so important to Rudolph," explains Muldowney. "The form of the building as a 'U' shape. The creation of the open plaza in the center of the building."
"We have good documentation of how the building looked," she said. "The school board has original construction documents. I think it could be ... brought back."
Howey agrees.
"It should be as easy to renovate as other building types," said Howey. "They had the eyebrows ... they took those down. So they destroyed the climate design feature that Rudolph had originally put in. Then they destroyed the roofs; there is nothing wrong with a flat roof as long as you keep a good roof on it."
In the last decade the "clouds" or "eyebrows," Rudolph's concrete sunshades on the building were removed and replaced with canvas. A new metal hip roof was placed the existing flat roof as well, drastically changing the building's appearance.
The Sarasota County History Center has written an application for a "Multiple Resource Nomination" from the National Park Service to cover buildings from the post-World War II era of the Sarasota school of architecture.
"The cover nomination establishes a period of significance, the broad architectural context, and the broad historical context," said Lorrie Muldowney, historic preservation specialist for the Sarasota County Historical Center.
The period of significance has been identified as 1941 through the mid-1970s, according to Muldowney. And although the National Park Service review and approval is pending, the nomination has been accepted by the state of Florida and reviewed and approved by the Florida National Register Review Board, she said.
"Sarasota school" survey
In 1995, the county's historic resources department contracted with a preservation expert to conduct a Sarasota school of architecture survey, and about 300 buildings were identified. Of those included in the survey, 13 were identified as by Rudolph.
Since that survey, two of Rudolph's houses have been torn down.
"I think that what's happening now, they're really going to regret 20 years down the line," said Rohan. "Everybody really regretted the demolition of Penn Station, and 20 years from now you're really going to regret all of this because you're not leaving any kind of built legacy."
"It's this generational hatred," he continues. "The people that are tearing these buildings down are of that generation who reacted so strongly against modern architecture and they're not leaving the choice to subsequent generations to judge."
Local architect Joseph King, and author of "Paul Rudolph: The Florida Houses" agrees.
"It will be a loss to lose that building in the sense that a building is a physical representation of ideas," said King. "While the drawings and photographs remain, it is not the same thing as experiencing the building."
Rohan believes that rescuing Riverview High School from destruction should be a priority.
"Modern architecture -- the buildings pose certain questions about the way you live," said Rohan. "These buildings by Rudolph are really a reminder of how you could live sensitively with the landscape and the environment and be aware of it."


February 28th, 2006 Architectural Record News wrote:Rudolph’s Riverview High School Threatened with Demolition
by David Sokol

In February, Florida’s Sarasota County School Board announced plans to demolish Riverview High School. The open, Modernist structure of concrete and glass-on-steel frame was designed by architect Paul Rudolph in 1958. Sarasota School of Architecture author John Howey, FAIA, says the building possessed “a subtle poetry,â€￾ and exhibited the best of the regionalist movement’s blend of modernist forms and climate sensitivity.
According to the school board, Riverview can no longer be maintained, partially because of changes made over the life of the building. Chuck Collins, director of construction for the Sarasota County School Board, points out that the re-worked air conditioning system is already out of date, that pipes and wires block light coming into hallways, and that the school is far too small to accommodate the school’s 3,000 students. Security is difficult given Rudolph's open design. Furthermore, officials want a new school to accommodate larger common areas and new technology spaces. Martie Lieberman, Board Secretary for the Sarasota Architectural Foundation, is fighting to save the building, and is astonished at the negative effects of so-called school improvements. “They substituted flat roofs for pitched roofs, misplaced air conditioning equipment—they never consulted anybody about integrity.â€￾ Howie, who also sits on the Architectural Foundation, says the organization is considering forming a not-for-profit body that will fund the shortfall between new construction and rehabilitation. In the meantime, the school district is preparing to construct a new building, designed by local firm BMK Architects, immediately adjacent to the Rudolph structure on the 42-acre site. The predecessor will be demolished upon completion, in 2008, and will be replaced with a parking lot.


dwellmag.com wrote:Editor's Travel Notes
by Sam Grawe

From our modern-landmarks-in-peril department comes the news of plans to raze Paul Rudolph’s landmark Riverview High School in Sarasota, Florida. (T)Here is a recent Herald Tribune article that covers the story in great detail. Rudolph’s buildings have been the subject of controversy in the past, and his work continues to inspire strong feelings. I became a Rudolph fan while attending Colgate University, and may have been the only student on campus who actually enjoyed spending the majority of his time in the Dana Arts Center. If you are interested in helping save Riverview High School, we suggest you get in touch with the Paul Rudolph Foundation.
Last edited by MD² on Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:28 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Postby Futura Girl » Fri Apr 28, 2006 12:36 am

this is a really important issue.
can someone please alert recent past network and let's get a ball rolling on some national public outcry.
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Postby MD² » Fri Apr 28, 2006 5:04 am

Futura Girl wrote:...can someone please alert recent past network...

Sent them a mail... Will keep you posted...

As trivial as this might sound, History (& therefore Culture) exists only if it exists...

I am really outraged to see that people in charge of education could make such a decision!

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Postby nichols » Fri Apr 28, 2006 10:17 am

Can someone alert the Treasure Island people in St. Petersburg? Are there other Florida mods that might not have heard of this threat?

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Postby MD² » Thu May 11, 2006 9:20 am


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Postby MD² » Sat May 13, 2006 7:14 am

Futura Girl wrote:this is a really important issue.
can someone please alert recent past network and let's get a ball rolling on some national public outcry.

Christine Madrid French has now posted the story on the RPPN website.

See: http://www.recentpast.org/ & http://www.recentpast.org/types/schools/index.html

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1958 Paul Rudolph School in FL threatened

Postby Nils M. Schweizer Fellow » Wed May 17, 2006 2:43 pm

As an important mcm structure located in Florida, the Nils M. Schweizer Fellows (www.centralfloridamodern.com) will have their members sign the petion to save this important example of architecture at their next meeting.
Kudos to modern lovers everywhere for their efforts with this cause.

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Postby MD² » Tue May 23, 2006 9:46 pm


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Rudolph's Riverview Hish School

Postby RTClapp » Wed May 24, 2006 8:56 am

There is now a web site (blog) that gives updates of the Riverview issue and shows ways individuals can help - petition, contact school board, etc.

Go to http://saveriverview.blogspot.com/ for more information.

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Postby MD² » Tue Jun 13, 2006 5:33 am

Tuesday June 13, 2006
Today, the Sarasota County School Board will hold a public workshop from 10 a.m. to noon in its chambers at 1980 Landings Blvd. to discuss plans for rebuilding Riverview High School...
Preservationists have been granted a 15 minutes period to convince the School Board to reconsider its decision and save the Paul Rudolph structure.
The School Board will not be taking public comment.


Here are some recent articles published in Southwest Florida's Herald Tribune:

NEWS & ARTICLES
Paul Rudolph fans to speak out - 2006.06.11
Riverview High is a jewel in Sarasota's architectural legacy - 2006.06.09
Preserving buildings a hot issue - 2006.05.06

OPINIONS
Preserve our architectural legacy - 2006.06.12
Riverview High design was flawed - 2006.06.09
High noon for Riverview - 2006.06.08
Riverview offers lesson on resources - 2006.06.07
School is architecturally historic - 2006.06.03
Riverview's design didn't function - 2006.05.20
Architects astir over Riverview plan - 2006.05.19

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SAVE Riverview Petitions

Postby RTClapp » Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:21 pm

Thank you to all that signed and delivered petitions in support of saving the Paul Rudolph buildings at the Riverview High School campus in Sarasota, FL.

Approximately 700 signatures were turned in to the school board this morning at a School board workshop held to discuss Riverview options.

More information will be posted soon at the Save Riverview blog-site http://saveriverview.blogspot.com/

At the present time it does not appear favorable that the buildings will be saved. The school board decision will likely be made on June 20.


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Riverview High School - Photographs

Postby Kelviin » Wed Jun 14, 2006 2:54 pm

Hello - My name is Kelvin Dickinson and I'm a member of the Paul Rudolph Foundation. As you might know, Paul left his estate to the Library of Congress when he died, and they are in possession of all of the records (plans,photos,etc.) for this project.

My job with the Foundation is to create a digital archive of Paul's work so that it can be readily accessed on the web by students and others. A lot of the information we have is in the form of personal items and publications about his individual works. The Library of Congress possesses everything that was drawn by Paul during the creation of Riverview HS.

As news of the proposed demolition has spread, we've received a lot of requests for photos (both historic and present) of the existing building. Unfortunately, both the Foundation and I are located in NYC, so it makes getting to Sarasota to photograph the project impossible, and the LOC has all of the records stored so getting copies is also not feasible in the short term.

I'd like to see if anyone would be willing to either send copies of photos you have or take photos of Paul's Sarasota work (if in the neighborhood), especially the two High Schools - Riverview and Sarasota. Eventually, these photos will become part of a digital archive that I am assembling as part of a new Foundation website. For links to the Paul Rudolph Foundation, you can go to www.paulrudolph.org, and you can reach me at kelviin@mindspring.com.

Thanks for any help you can provide and its exciting to see that there are others who believe Paul Rudolph's Riverview HS is worth preserving!


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Sarasota School Board Decision

Postby RTClapp » Tue Jun 20, 2006 5:20 pm

Tonight the Sarasota School Board voted 5-0 to demolish the Riverview school, including the Rudolph buildings.

We are all very disappointed.

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Postby MD² » Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:24 pm

Sad to see that the education authorities think they can build a future by throwing away their foundations.

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Postby MD² » Thu Jun 22, 2006 6:49 am


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Postby MD² » Fri Jun 23, 2006 7:52 am

From SAVE Riverview

Friday, June 23, 2006
Message From AIA

They know not what they do...

The Sarasota School Board voted 5-0 to demolish Paul Rudolph's original Riverview High School buildings on Tuesday night.

The presentation from the Save Riverview side was excellent. The Sarasota Architectural Foundation (SAF) and the Sarasota Historic Alliance both offered funds to the school board toward paying the architects to do further studies to save the Rudolph buildings. John Howey, FAIA and Joe King, AIA, both of which have written books on Rudolph's work, gave compelling historical reasons on the importance of the Riverview buildings. Guy Peterson, FAIA, Riverview grad, told of how his firm has recently renovated Rudolph's Revere House and added an addition that compliments Rudolph's work because of the owner's insight of its historical importance. Carl Abbott, FAIA presented a diagrammatic site plan developed by his committee that illustrated how the existing Rudolph buildings could be worked with a new school design that satisfied the school board's requirement of centralized parking and single entrance onto the campus.

On behalf of AIA Florida, President-Elect Mark Smith, AIA gave a plea that these historic buildings, once gone, can never be replaced, and that these historic buildings belong to the entire world not just Sarasota.

A handful of teachers and parents spoke on how they wanted a new school. Many could not seem to understand that saving the school and designing a 21st century school were not mutually exclusive.

Mark Smith, AIA commented that, “It is extremely disappointing and disheartening to watch the irreplaceable be deemed irrelevant. To watch our past be disregarded. To watch history be erased.â€￾

Thank you to the Save Riverview Committee for your valiant efforts.

It is unfortunate that the School Board members could not see the value in restoration and preserving a piece of Florida history.

email: aiaflanews@aiafla.org
phone: 850-222-7590
web: http://www.aiafla.org

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Postby Futura Girl » Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:31 pm

this is heartbreaking.
reminds me of our own city throwing millions away to tear down some of our historic libraries so they add 50 square feet and wifi.

huh?
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Postby MD² » Sun Jun 25, 2006 7:18 pm

Again, from Richard T. Clapp's Save Riverview blog, Norman Foster has written to the Sarasota County School Board.

Here is the letter


Sarasota Herald Tribune's June 24th, 2006 column: Lord Foster weighs in on Riverview

Thank you for your support Sir.

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Postby MD² » Wed Jun 28, 2006 1:45 pm

From Sarasota's Pelican Press - 2006.06.28: Preservationists decry Riverview demolition decision

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Postby So_Cal_Native_in_Texas » Tue Jul 04, 2006 10:43 pm

You know, the Sarasota School Board members need to have their homes bulldozed, just for laughs.

Then we can tell them to get over it. "After all, it's JUST a building! It's not like it matters!"

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Postby MD² » Sat Jul 08, 2006 6:43 pm

There's a great column by Harold Bubil in today's Sarasota Herald Tribune: Debating the merits of buildings

...and also this: Tom Luzier defends the Sarasota Architectural Foundation on Riverview issue (Luzier is the leader of the SAF).

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National Trust to Review Rudolph Buildings in Sarasota

Postby RTClapp » Tue Feb 06, 2007 7:24 pm

Today the Sarasota School Board voted 4-1 to accept the offer made by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to facilitate an independent review of the Rudolph buildings on the Riverview site.

The review will likely be a three-day workshop at no cost to the community or the Sarasota County School Board and will focus on the feasibility of rehabilitating the original Paul Rudolph courtyard buildings and incorporating them into the campus of the new 21st-century Riverview.

The SAVE Riverview group is pleased that the School Board took this step.

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Postby MCMAdmirer » Tue Feb 06, 2007 7:52 pm

so is there still hope?

*just finished reading this for the first time tonight, still in shock that there would be thoughts to destroy this gorgeous building!* (so excuse me for not thinking coherently if it is obvious that there's still some hope for this building to survive!)

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Postby mod cats » Sun Jun 17, 2007 5:45 pm

Here's the latest on the efforts to save Riverview High School.....



Riverview Committee, Merged with SAF, Raising Funds for Design Competition


Sarasota, FL (June 15, 2007) — Concerned members of the community and local architects who have been working to preserve Riverview High School’s Paul Rudolph buildings have merged with The Sarasota Architectural Foundation.

SAF’s Riverview Committee chair, James Bowen of Bowen Architecture, says, “We are working in partnership with the Sarasota County School Board to develop a project that is compatible with the new Riverview High School and fulfills the school board’s expectations.â€￾

The committee is launching an international competition to design a new use for the Rudolph courtyard buildings. Proposals submitted must include viable recommendations for alternative use of the revitalized structures, as well as plans to compensate for the parking lot and playing fields currently scheduled to be built in that area.

The Riverview Committee is conducting a campaign to raise funds for the competition. The initial drive will focus on matching a $25,000 grant awarded by the World Monument Fund and raising an additional $50,000.

A Request for Proposals (RFP) from architect and developer teams will be announced in August 2007, with proposals due in November 2007. Adaptive use and financing plans for the preservation of these important buildings must be approved before the school board’s March 16, 2008 deadline.

Bill A. Liskamm, FAIA, a well known authority on design and development processes, has been engaged as a professional advisor and facilitator for the SAF effort, known as Revive Rudolph’s Riverview.

“Sarasota is fortunate to have this seminal project,â€￾ Bowen says. “The need for preservation is obvious, because the building is the foremost example of the Sarasota School of Architecture and because of the international notoriety of the architect, Paul Rudolph.â€￾ He adds, “But it is equally significant that an historic project exhibits fundamental features of sustainable design, such as natural ventilation, shading, and the use of natural light. As part of the sustainable design revolution, these attributes are among the primary concerns of the architectural profession today.â€￾

For further information on The Riverview Committee’s search for an acceptable solution that will save this icon of Modern architecture, contact Les Fishman, Chair of SAF, at 941.365.4723, or write to James Bowen, Chair of The Riverview Committee (james@bowenarchitecture.com). Contributions are tax-deductible and can be made through the SAF Website: www.sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org.

mod cats
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Postby mod cats » Mon Jul 30, 2007 5:16 pm

Tell one, tell ALL ... the time has come for creative people to step up and present a plan that will preserve Riverview High School....



Design Competition RFQ for Creative Preservation of Riverview’s Rudolph buildings

Sarasota, FL (July 30, 2007) — The Sarasota Architectural Foundation has sent out a Request For Qualifications, initiating a competition for a design and financial plan to provide alternative use and preservation of Paul Rudolph’s historic buildings at Sarasota’s Riverview High School, built in 1958, which are currently scheduled for demolition.

The RFQ is seeking up to five qualified architect and developer teams with demonstrated experience in creative planning and implementation of projects that include the use of historic buildings. Their design and financial proposals must include plans for revitalizing the Rudolph courtyard buildings for alternative use, financing the work and the long-term preservation of the buildings, and compensating for the parking lot and playing fields currently scheduled to be built in that area.

SAF’s Riverview Committee has engaged Bill Liskamm, internationally renowned architect and environmental planner, as a professional advisor and facilitator for the competition. Liskamm has led more than 60 design competitions and has served on the National Endowment for the Arts’ Competition Advisory Panel.

“This process has been successfully used in other parts of the country to preserve important historic architectural landmarks by giving them new uses,â€￾ Liskamm says. He will manage the distribution of the RFQ to over 2,000 architects, AIA chapters and developers nation-wide.

Liskamm emphasizes the importance of saving these buildings, produced in Rudolph’s first public building design project, which incorporate a visual and spatial richness that characterized American Modern architecture.

The RFQ will be due by September 14, and finalists will be announced on September 17.

A Request for Proposals (RFP) will be available in mid-August, and a preproposal on-site briefing will be held on August 14. This will give interested architects and developers a chance to visit the buildings and have questions answered by Liskamm and Riverview Committee members.

Proposals will be due in November 2007, with a midpoint review scheduled for October 15. The Riverview Committee will be working with the Sarasota County School Board to refine and finalize the selected adaptive use and financing plan, to ensure that it meets the school district’s objectives before the school board’s March 16, 2008 deadline.

The Riverview Committee is conducting a campaign to raise funds for the competition. The initial drive focuses on matching a $25,000 grant awarded by the World Monuments Fund, with the goal of raising an additional $50,000. This project has been made possible in part by the “World Monuments Fund ‘Modernism at Risk’ program, founding sponsor Knoll.â€￾

For further information on The Riverview Committee’s search for an acceptable solution that will save this icon of Modern architecture, contact Les Fishman, Chair of SAF, at 941.365.4723, or write to James Bowen, Chair of The Riverview Committee (james@bowenarchitecture.com). To download the RFQ or to make a tax-deductible contribution, visit the SAF Website: www.sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org <http://www.sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org/> .

mod cats
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Postby mod cats » Thu Nov 22, 2007 6:32 pm

Check this out.....


SAF’s Revive Rudolph’s Riverview committee
will move forward on Riverview Music Quadrangle plan


Sarasota, FL (November 21, 2007) — Sarasota Architectural Foundation’s Revive Rudolph’s Riverview committee presented information on preservation and alternative use proposals for the historic buildings designed by Paul Rudolph on the Riverview High School campus at the Sarasota County School Board’s November 20, 2007, meeting.

The presentation by committee member Peter Brown, AIA, LEED AP, introduced to the school board and to the public four proposals submitted by pre-qualified design and financial planning teams.

The proposal for Riverview Music Quadrangle, submitted by the design team of RMJM Hillier with Diane Lewis Architect and Beckelman+Capalino, LLC, New York, NY, with Seibert Architects, Sarasota, FL, is the plan that the committee will be moving forward on. They will be working with the team to firm up funding and to develop complete and refined plans, meeting periodically with school board members and staff to arrive an acceptable proposal prior to the board’s March 2008 deadline.

This plan would offer a collaborative environment for new and existing Sarasota music activities. It would complement the Riverview High School and other Sarasota County school music programs, and it would provide studio space and performance venues for community groups and orchestras. According to information submitted with the proposal by architect Diane Lewis, the concept has the support of prominent musical talent, such as Wynton Marsalis. It also has the advantage of cultural networks Lewis and Laurie Beckelman have developed through their work in international architecture, ivy league academics, historic preservation, and premier cultural and civic space design.

Other proposals submitted that would be considered if a major obstacle were to prevent development of the Music Quadrangle include a K-8 private or charter school plan submitted by Mark S. Kauffman, Developer, and The ADP Group, Architects, of Sarasota, FL, and a mixed use plan that would create 50 housing units and 50,000 square feet of commercial/retail operations, submitted by The Folsom Group and TOTeMs Architecture Inc. of Sarasota, FL.

A plan submitted by Mack Scogin Merrill Elam, Architects, of Atlanta, GA, in association with John McAslan + Partners, London, which proposed an adaptive use joining the historic and new campuses, was rejected by the board for noncompliance with their requirements.

A jury of internationally recognized architecture and design notables gathered in Sarasota on Saturday, November 17, to review the proposals and recommend the order in which they should be considered. Funding for the competition was provided in part by the World Monuments Fund “Modernism at Riskâ€￾ program and its founding sponsor, Knoll.

The proposals will be presented on Thursday, November 29, at an event sponsored by the SAF, in association with SCOPE (Sarasota County Openly Prepares for Excellence) and the Sarasota County Arts Council. The presentation, Revive Rudolph’s Riverview – Campaign for Preservation & Winning Adaptive Use Design, will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Roskamp Center for the Arts & Humanities, 1226 N. Tamiami Trail. It will include a showing of a film created by “Metropolisâ€￾ magazine entitled “Site Specific.â€￾ More information about the event, which is open to the public and free, is available by calling 941.365.4723. Following the presentation, a public display of submitted proposals is scheduled for the Herald-Tribune Building, 1741 Main Street, Sarasota, FL.

For further information about efforts to preserve the historic Rudolph buildings on the Riverview campus, please contact Samantha Allard, RRR committee chair, at 941.365.4723 or Les Fishman, SAF chair, at 941.365.4723. Or visit www.sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org <http://www.sarasotaarchitecturalfoundation.org/> .

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johnnyapollo
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Urgent Need for Support of Riverview HS

Postby johnnyapollo » Thu Jun 12, 2008 1:51 pm

Wanted to revive this thread based on an email forwarded to me today from Tom Little, president of the local DOCOMOMO chapter:

Hi All:

Sorry for the "crisis mode", but SAF needs
e-mails of your support for the Riverview HS
reuse by this Friday, June 13th when SAF
will submit its proposal. The Board will make
its final decision on Tuesday, June 17th.

If you can spare just a moment, please
address statements of support to:

School Board of Sarasota County, Florida
and send your e-mail to: RVGarvin@comcast.net

Many thanks,
Bill

Bill Liskamm, FAIA

The link to the blog here: http://saveriverview.blogspot.com/

-- John
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."
Philip K. Dick

Desperately Seeking Modern
http://modernseeker.blogspot.com


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