FLW Hollyhock House declared National Historic Landmark

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FLW Hollyhock House declared National Historic Landmark

Postby nichols » Mon May 07, 2007 9:47 am

May 3, 2007

For Immediate Release
HOLLYHOCK HOUSE DECLARED NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK

The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs’ Hollyhock House, designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is designated a National Historic Landmark by the U. S. Secretary of the Interior

LOS ANGELES—The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs is pleased to announce that Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne has designated The Aline Barnsdall Complex, which includes the renowned Hollyhock House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Aline Barnsdall, as a National Historic Landmark, recognizing its importance in interpreting the heritage and history of the United States.

According to the Department of the Interior, “the National Historic Landmark designation is the highest such recognition accorded by the nation to historic properties determined to be of exceptional value in representing or illustrating an important theme, event, or person in the history of the nation. Today, fewer than 2,500 properties bear this national distinction.â€￾


Built between 1919 and 1923, Hollyhock House is Wright’s first Los Angeles project, and represents his earliest efforts to develop a regionally appropriate style for Southern California. This effort culminated in a remarkable combination of house and gardens. In addition to the central garden court, each major interior space adjoins an equivalent exterior space, connected either by glass doors, a porch, pergola, or colonnade. In 1927, Aline Barnsdall donated Hollyhock House and the surrounding 11.5 acres to the City of Los Angeles for use as a public park.

Hollyhock House, located in Barnsdall Park, is open to the public Wednesday through Sunday. House tours are scheduled at 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery adjacent to Hollyhock House. General adult admission is $7, students and seniors $3, and children under 12 are admitted free of charge. For more information, please call 323.644.6269.


About the Department of Cultural Affairs
The Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) generates and supports high quality arts and cultural experiences for residents and visitors to the City of Los Angeles. DCA advances the social and economic impact of the arts and assures access to arts and cultural experiences through grant making, marketing, public and community arts programming, arts education, and creating partnerships with artists and arts and cultural organizations in every community in the City of Los Angeles.

DCA grants $3.4 million annually to over 300 artists and nonprofit arts organizations and awards the Artist-in Residence (A.I.R.) and City of Los Angeles (C.O.L.A.) Individual Artist Fellowships. It provides arts and cultural programming in numerous Neighborhood Arts and Cultural Centers, theaters, and several arts and education programs for young people. The Department directs public art projects and manages the City’s Arts Development Fee, Art Collection, and Murals Program. DCA markets the City’s cultural events through development and collaboration with strategic partners, design and production of creative promotional materials, and management of the culturela.org website.

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Postby SDR » Tue May 08, 2007 4:08 pm

Good news !

Wouldn't it be great if the lost and the unbuilt portions of the estate could be recreated ? I predict that this type of reconstruction will be the next step in architectural preservation -- and Olive Hill is an obvious candidate.

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Postby moderns-r-us » Tue May 08, 2007 6:55 pm

Bender equiped with circuits to see the future!
"Better Living Through Modernism"

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Postby SDR » Tue May 08, 2007 7:49 pm

Bender's left eye is bar code reader. . .the rest follows.

Actually, Bender is just back from the thirtieth century. You wouldn't believe what I've heard. He's drinking a little more than usual. . .

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Postby ChrisLAXEncounter » Tue May 08, 2007 10:35 pm

Hope it stays safe - although federal funds should be available to help if it doesn't.

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Postby egads » Wed May 09, 2007 9:03 am

It just went through a major renovation. They have done what they can do. The whole house is made out of clay hollow block. Not the best thing for an earthquake zone. :roll:

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Postby HappyBunny » Wed May 09, 2007 8:14 pm

Having just seen Taliesin West this week, I am excited to hear this! I was sad to hear there that something like 1 out of 3 of the buildings he designed are gone. Good to hear this one will live on.

I heartily recommend all you Modernistas go check Taliesin West out, BTW. Its wonderful how you can go through it all and just "live" in the spaces, as Wright wanted people to. You can sit in the furniture he built, absorb the view and the light... and really imagine how it was back in the day when he was designing. He was such an interesting guy too--he built much of the place out of recycled materials, long before it was en vogue.

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Postby SDR » Wed May 09, 2007 8:34 pm

"I laugh in the face of danger! Then I hide until it goes away." Bender

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Postby nichols » Thu Jul 19, 2007 2:53 pm

From the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power:

OFFICIALS DEDICATE WATER-CONSERVING LANDSCAPE AT BARNSDALL ART PARK
Project Recalls Frank Lloyd Wright Vision for Hollyhock House “Great Lawnâ€￾


LOS ANGELES – Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti, officials from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks (LADRP), and community representatives dedicated the “Great Lawnâ€￾ adjacent to Wright’s Hollyhock House in Barnsdall Art Park into a California Friendlyâ„¢ landscape.

"Aline Barnsdall gave her home on Olive Hill to the people of Los Angeles to use for reflection and recreation," said Council President Eric Garcetti. "The new landscaping for the Great Lawn will beautify this public treasure and help educate the public about how their own choices can better reflect California's needs and its climate."

With views of the Hollywood Sign and the Griffith Park Observatory as a backdrop, officials and community leaders cut the red ribbon to symbolically dedicate the Barnsdall Art Park Great Lawn Landscape Restoration Project. The high-visibility project will serve as a demonstration site for public education and awareness of sustainable landscape design, using California Friendly™ landscaping, weather-based irrigation, and other elements designed to promote outdoor water conservation. Joining in the event were Council President Garcetti; Robert Rozanski, LADWP chief administrative officer; Timothy F. Brick, chairman of Metropolitan’s Board of Directors; Mark Mariscal, superintendent of operations, LA Recreation and Parks; Gary L. Moore, general manager, LA Bureau of Engineering; and Kathy Irish, interim general manager of the Department of Cultural Affairs.

“Water savings will be achieved through almost every element of this project. We anticipate a water savings up to 1.45 million gallons per year at Barnsdall Art Park—enough to meet the annual water needs of nine families,â€￾ said LADWP’s Rozanski. “Barnsdall Art Park is one of about 70 Los Angeles City Parks that LADWP is targeting to improve the efficiency of water use through ‘smart’ irrigation and other measures.â€￾

Among those parks are three additional historic sites slated to soon receive complete smart irrigation systems: St. James Park, Arroyo Seco Park at Avenue 64 and Victory Memorial Grove in Elysian Park. “Through this partnership that has been forged between LADWP and the Department of Recreation and Parks, greatly needed irrigation infrastructure improvements are being realized. We are excited to be able to upgrade our parks to 21st century water conservation standards,â€￾ said Recreation and Parks Superintendent Mariscal.

The Great Lawn Restoration Project design was inspired by the original landscape architecture for the site created by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright, when the house was under construction between 1921 and 1925. The plant selection was based as much as possible on Lloyd Wright’s original list of plants. Among them are 15 different species of shrubs and ground cover, and six species of trees—all of which are water efficient and thrive in the Southern California climate.

The Barnsdall Art Park renovation is the flagship of 21 projects funded by Metropolitan’s City Makeover Program, established to transform highly visible public spaces in Southern California into native and California Friendlyâ„¢ plant showcases. A $75,000 City Makeover grant covered half of the $150,000 project. LADWP provided an additional $25,000 in funds from its water conservation program that promotes the use of “smartâ€￾ irrigation techniques. LADWP, the Department of Recreation and Parks, and the Bureau of Engineering all provided substantial in-kind services to design and construct the project.

"This project is exactly what we were hoping would sprout from our City Makeover program—a popular public space remade into a vision of smart, environmentally sensitive landscaping that saves water, particularly in this record dry year,â€￾ said Metropolitan’s Brick. “We hope to inspire the thousands of people who visit the park annually to adopt the California Friendlyâ„¢ ideal for their own yards."

The landscape restoration of the “Great Lawn,â€￾ nearly one acre in size and dramatically situated on a hill above Hollywood Boulevard, features native and drought-tolerant plants such as Hybrid Bermuda grass. The new lawn uses 21% less water than typical cool season turf. Tough, drought-tolerant and California native plants typically need 75% less water during the first two years and thrive largely on natural precipitation after that.

The irrigation system utilizes low-cost, high-efficiency sprinkler heads along with a state-of-the-art, weather-based controller to ensure the lawn is watered only when necessary. Weather-based irrigation has been shown to reduce annual water use by as much as one acre-foot (326,000 gallons) for each acre that is irrigated, explained Tom Gackstetter, LADWP water conservation manager.

Among other water-saving landscape elements, grading and soil rehabilitation will minimize precipitation runoff and retain irrigation through improved infiltration and reduced evaporation, while ensuring drainage away from the historic Hollyhock House.

LADWP served as the lead agency for the project, provided the demolition and grading, and shared the project management duties with LADRP. LADRP provided the advance planning, schematic design, installation and construction management. The Bureau of Engineering provided design development, construction documentation, construction supervision and signage design.

The City of Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission declared Hollyhock House a historic-cultural monument in January 1963, and Barnsdall Center and Barnsdall Park historical-cultural monuments in February 1965. All three facilities were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in May 1971 by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Hollyhock House was declared a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior in May 2007.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the nation’s largest municipal utility, provides reliable, low-cost water and power services to Los Angeles residents and businesses in an environmentally responsible manner. LADWP services about 1.4 million electric customers and 680,000 water customers in Los Angeles. For more information, visit www.ladwp.com.

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Postby nichols » Tue Jul 29, 2008 4:55 pm

Los Angeles Times

State funding will aid restoration of L.A.'s Hollyhock House
By Amanda Covarrubias, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
3:44 PM PDT, July 28, 2008
Image
(lapl)

The city of Los Angeles will receive nearly $2 million in state funding to restore and transform the landmark Hollyhock House in Barnsdall Art Park into a gallery, officials said today.

The national historic landmark in Los Feliz was designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in the 1920s in a style he referred to as California Romanza. It was retrofitted and partially restored after undergoing extensive damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

The $1.9 million in state funding will be used to complete and expand on that work, city officials said. Project Restore, a city agency, will oversee the renovation, which is expected to be completed in 2012....

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/valle ... 9829.story


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