Antrim House - Harwell Hamilton Harris, 1956

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Miguel
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Antrim House - Harwell Hamilton Harris, 1956

Postby Miguel » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:24 pm

This beautiful gem is one of the most amazing homes I've ever been in. Heavily influenced by Japanese architecture, this Fresno home is phenomenal in every sense of the word, especially for lovers of Asian-influenced ranch homes. Unfortunately, my iPhone panoramic pictures don't really do it justice, but give a sense of the serene beauty of this minty piece of architectural art. The house is described and beautifully pictured in Alan Hess and Noah Sheldon's "The Ranch House" book.

Harwell Hamilton Harris biography from :
"Harwell Hamilton Harris (1903 - November 18, 1990) was a modernist American architect, noted for his work in Southern California that assimilated European and American influences. He began his studies at Pomona College but left after a year to study sculpture at the Otis Art Institute, now Otis College of Art and Design. In 1928, he began apprenticing under architect Richard Neutra with whom he was associated until 1932. (Fellow apprentices included Gregory Ain and Raphael Soriano.) Adopting Neutra's modernist sensibility, Harris merged the vernacular of California with a sensitivity to site and materials characteristic of the American Arts & Crafts Movement. In his residential work of the 1930s and 1940s, primarily in California, Harris created a tension and a continuum between exterior and interior with continuous rooflines. Learning from Frank Lloyd Wright, he designed interior spaces that are often based on the cruciform plan. His work is characterized by a careful use of materials and clean, fluid spaces"

The commission of the Antrim house is described in the book "Harwell Hamilton Harris" by Lisa Germany - 2000
"Of the six residential commissions that came to Harris in 1956 and 1957, four came from clients across the state. A case is point was the house commission for Mr. and Ms. C.R. Antrim. While they were in college in California, both have fallen in love with the Fellowship Park house. Years later, after they purchased two and a half acres of a fig orchard in Fresno, California, they remembered Harris and contacted him at his office in his Fort Worth office. They knew that the distance would make the job difficult so Cal Antrim made a model of their house so they could monitor the way that light would fall across the house during the day. As it turned out the Antrim house did take Harris back beyond his late Arts and Crafts houses to the period of Fellowship Park. Of the many glazed doors that opened the house to nature, there were some that were translucent and recalled, for those that were observant, the still earlier Lowe house. For this reason and because the Antrims appreciated the simple, quiet forms that had always shaped Harris's most elegant work, this house, the last of his California designs was an unconscious touchstone in his ongoing yet transplanted career"
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Josquin
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Antrim House

Postby Josquin » Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:48 pm


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Joe
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Postby Joe » Tue Jan 19, 2010 3:41 pm

pretty cool stuff. dig the water feature!

srk1941
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Postby srk1941 » Wed Jan 20, 2010 9:57 am

Steven Keylon
Village Green - National Historic Landmark


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