Looking for info on architect named Paul Haynes

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sburger
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Looking for info on architect named Paul Haynes

Postby sburger » Sun Mar 27, 2011 9:33 am

Hi All,

I'm new to the forum, and thrilled to have found this site. We bought a nice Mid Century Modern home in South Pasadena, and are interested in researching it's architectural history. City records show that it was designed by a person named Paul Haynes. A google search for that name comes up with only one obscure reference from the San Diego Modern website. On the page for Mosher and Drew, it says:

"Following his service in the US Navy (1942-1946), Drew rejoined his architecture career where he met Robert Mosher in Paul Haynes' Los Angeles office."

I e-mailed Keith York (creator of the site), and he says he is going to check with Mosher himself! He also recomemend this board as well.

So if you have any info or insight, I'd love to hear from you. Now I'm going to go through all of the interesting looking threads on this site and get some ideas for improving our house :-)
Steve Burger
South Pasadena, CA

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Joe
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Postby Joe » Sun Mar 27, 2011 11:43 am

welcome steve!

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scowsa
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Postby scowsa » Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:32 pm

Haynes, Paul (1905-1984)
Education: Beaux Arts, Los Angeles.
Work: Architect Paul Haynes was a resident of Pasadena for more than 40 years and designed many homes, schools, office buildings, and hospitals throughout Los Angeles County.

After the Depression, Haynes joined the architectural firm of Myron Hunt & Harold C. Chambers, working his way up to draftsman and then architect. Haynes passed his architectural examination in 1937. In 1938, he received a Langley Award from the American Institute of Architects in 1938, allowing him to study architecture throughout the eastern United States. After World War II, he opened his own firm. He later co-founded the firm of Haynes & Oakley in Sierra Madre, specializing in the design and planning of healthcare facilities.

Local projects include Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles.
Pasadena projects: Huntington Memorial Hospital at 100 W. California Boulevard; the Tabor House at 969 Hillside Terrace (1950); the Messler House at 135 Club Road (1950s); and offices at 1428 W. Colorado Boulevard (1957) and 1446 W. Colorado Boulevard (1950).

From Page 86 of
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Slim and Gabby
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Postby Slim and Gabby » Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:12 am

Holy Cow, Scowsa!

That Pasadena study is one awesome document. I perused the style definitions and don't think I've seen anything so concise and readable.

Great stuff!

Gabby
Pen-gu-ins is pracatically chickinz, and I hates to see chickinz cry so much, I has to put’em outta ther mizzery!

sburger
Modern Groupie
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Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 9:24 am
Location: South Pasadena

Postby sburger » Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:11 pm

Steve Burger

South Pasadena, CA

srk1941
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Postby srk1941 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 3:11 pm

The first mention I could find was in the LA Times in 1939. Paul E. Haynes of Pasadena won a $25 award for a small house design from the Los Angeles Brick Exchange.

I found an LA Times mention from 1953 that he went to the University of Minnesota.

Also, in 1956 it was announced that a Metropolitan Coach Lines building on San Vicente between Melrose and Santa Monica in West Hollywood was designed by him.

Lastly, notice that a new warehouse building at 3744 S. Broadway designed by Haynes would be built, from 1958.
Steven Keylon
Village Green - National Historic Landmark


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