"The Incredibles"

Burlesque beauties, pinup girls, vintage fashion, swanky suits, go-go boots, hairdoos,
cocktails, recipes, dancing, nostalgia and random retro lifestyle that a Space Age Atomic Age Bachelor might need to know about. Post War movies, television, broadway shows, music... exotica, lounge, cocktail, vocals, standards, space-age, swing, tiki, Modern Transportation, 1950s 1960s classic cars, monorails, scooters, trailers and trains, oh my...

Moderators: I_LUV_POWER!!!!, Joe, moderns-r-us, Tony, Futura Girl, sean, nichols, Java, Matt Deckard

User avatar
Satan's Sin
Modern Socialite
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2004 7:34 am
Location: Imperial Beach, CA

"The Incredibles"

Postby Satan's Sin » Sun Oct 31, 2004 12:36 pm

What I've seen so far indicates the Incredibles' home is an orgy of midcentury loveliness. This from the same mind that brought us "The Iron Giant," which was set mid-century and hit almost all midcentury design themes bang-on (with the exception of not having a minimalist home in the story).

Anyway, here's a link to Tiki Central, where some TCers were fortunate enough to get a tour of Pixar's studios this past Friday:

http://www.tikiroom.com/tikicentral/bb/ ... &forum=6&1

lasvegaslynn
Lotta Living Hostess
Lotta Living Hostess
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 6:24 pm
Location: Sherman Oaks and fabulous Las Vegas

The Incredibles

Postby lasvegaslynn » Sun Oct 31, 2004 4:21 pm

I, too, am looking forward to the movie. I noticed what a swank house they live in the first time I saw the DSL commercial tie-in. I can't remember which DSL provider the commercial was for but I sure do love the house!
Lynn in Sherman Oaks

www.classiclasvegas.squarespace.com (blog)

www.classiclasvegas.com (website)

KevInBoots
Modern Socialite
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Garvanza, where we put the HIP in Highland Park.

Postby KevInBoots » Sun Oct 31, 2004 7:20 pm

You know that at least some of the Pixar guys were into mid-century modern even before Brad Bird joined them when you notice touches like the Cherner chair in the background of Al's apartment in Toy Story 2.

I work in animation, where we're usually pretty immune to hype, and I've never seen such excitement and buzz about an animated film from within the animation community. I've already heard from half a dozen friends who have seen advance screenings, and so far it's 100% raves.

modfan
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2091
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 8:28 am
Location: East of Balboa Highlands in Sylmar

I noticed it too

Postby modfan » Mon Nov 01, 2004 5:52 am

In the commercials for it. Seems like finally homes in cartoons (er animation) come into the 21st century. Ya notice it in the Powerpuff Girls and The Grimm Adventures Of Billy & Mandy too and that cartoon "My Life as a Teenage Robot-XJ9 (Jenny) lives in a 'Wrightian' type house. I always wondered even as a kid why Tom & Jerry and Tweety & Sylvester were always being chased around a neighborhood that didn't look like the one I grew up in (ie much older that the typical cartoon viewer would have lived in at the time)
Last edited by modfan on Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
SDR
Lotta Living FANatic
Posts: 4783
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Location: San Francisco

Modern Cartoons

Postby SDR » Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:38 am

Was it at Warner Bros. and UPA that animation art directors introduced a new palette of shapes and colors, and a newly-stylized look, to the backgrounds of their cartoons, in the 'fifties? Seems to me there was a TV special on this subject a while back. . . Porky Pig and Mr Magoo, abstracted landscape features, floating architectural elements and free-form shapes. . .there's a connection here to the pastel yellows, acquas, pinks and grays, and the (Bauhaus-inspired?) industrial textures, informal typography and lay-out found in the commercial art and advartising design of the post-war years.

KevInBoots
Modern Socialite
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Garvanza, where we put the HIP in Highland Park.

Postby KevInBoots » Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:07 pm

It was UPA in the 50's that really pushed animation into new graphic territory. The guys who formed the studio had left Disney during the '41 strike and were really eager to get away from that style of animation. During the war most animation was under government contract, and that's what they focused on. Their big breakout short was "Hell Bent for Election," directed by Chuck Jones (tho' he was still at Warners at the time) for FDR's re-election campaign. I beleive it was in the wake of that film that they became UPA. The Magoo films were originally innovative, but most of what we see from those films were the later stuff, after the HUAC had wrecked the studio (the originators were a fiercely independent lot, and some leaned leftwards).

The best UPA films were from the late 40's and early 50's. They emphasized graphic, two-dimensional shapes, and limited animation (surprisingly effective, though now given a bad name from years of crap Sat. morning kiddie shows). The studio founders were deeply into modernist ideas, and you see it in the color palates and design work, and I think even in their storytelling. Check out "Gerald McBoing Boing," Rooty Toot Toot," and "The Tell Tale Heart" for highlights.

I think the Warners' film you're thinking of was Bob Clampett's "Porky in Wackyland." Cllampett was probably the most innovative of the Warners directors, and that film (I think from '38) went far afield from anything other animators were doing at the time. Abstract and surreal, with Porky struggling to make sense of it all. Clampetts best work came a little later, in cartoons like "The Great Piggy Bank Robbery." Later he did Beany and Cecile, which never really caught my fancy.

User avatar
Satan's Sin
Modern Socialite
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2004 7:34 am
Location: Imperial Beach, CA

Postby Satan's Sin » Mon Nov 01, 2004 3:23 pm

Speaking purely as a child, I hated those "minimalist" cartoons, particularly those "weird" WB cartoons like Porky in Wackyland, etc., I and more than one childhood friend considered those "modernistic" cartoons to be cheap and stripped down, and what we really liked was the lush detail and smooth animation of the 30s and 40s WB cartoons. Sat. morn cartoons of my childhood really were rotten, stiff-looking and cheap and niggardly with movement and background, and I'm sure they weren't any stylistic expiriment like Chuck Jones was trying, they really were just the cheapest way to do it, just as hack architects of the era were only interested in throwing up the quickest, cheapest bldg they could as opposed to exploring modernism. I was in NYC recently and finally saw the Seagram bldg up close, and for all its stark lines it really is put together with as much gorgeousness and attention to detail as a cathedral, and opposed to most flat-topped no-ornamentation skyscrapers I've seen, which look cheap and dead and seem to suck at your soul as soon as you step inside.

Even though I loved "old fashioned" cartoons as a child I can truly and honestly say that I did love "modernistic" homes of my childhood (of which there were more than a few in my hometown of Sarasota, FL), and the more different they were from an "old" house, the better.

KevInBoots
Modern Socialite
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Garvanza, where we put the HIP in Highland Park.

Postby KevInBoots » Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:06 pm

Actually, "Porky in Wackyland" wasn't an attempt at a new graphic style like the UPA cartoons. It was an attempt to do Dali in animation. The animation was as "full" as any of the other Warners cartoons of the 30's and 40's. Some of it does look a little crude today, because the Warner's animators were just starting to hit their stride, and Clampett was a very young director then (in both senses of the word).

You're certainly right about the Sat. AM cartoons that were made for TV. UPA pioneered what's known as limited animation as an artistic choice. It was only later, and most notably by Hanna Barbara, that limited animation was used as a labor-saving (read: cheaper) technique. That was the only way animation could be done for a TV schedule, which the Warners and UPA guys never really had to deal with.

When I was a kid, the cartoons I considered "old fashioned" were the Disney shorts. They seemed so tame and pointless compared to the Warners and better MGM shorts. Not that I saw much of any animation as a kid -- my Dad hated TV and we usually didn't have one till I was older.

User avatar
Futura Girl
Lotta Living Hostess
Lotta Living Hostess
Posts: 4161
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:54 pm
Location: Las VEGAS babay!
Contact:

Re: The Incredibles

Postby Futura Girl » Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:19 pm


KevInBoots
Modern Socialite
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Garvanza, where we put the HIP in Highland Park.

Yes, it's as good as I expected

Postby KevInBoots » Thu Nov 04, 2004 12:11 am


KevInBoots
Modern Socialite
Posts: 74
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:51 pm
Location: Garvanza, where we put the HIP in Highland Park.

Link to UPA cartoons

Postby KevInBoots » Thu Nov 04, 2004 11:54 pm

If anyone was reading the posts about the UPA studio and was curious, here's a link with some stills and some of the cartoons:



It has some annoying sound effects, and the navigation can be a little frustrating, but the cartoons are as fresh as ever.

Kevin

JAB
Special Secret Modern Agent
Posts: 545
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2002 7:31 am
Location: Downtown LA / South OC

Postby JAB » Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:54 pm

They obviously get it at Pixar. Anyone with any sense of design will love this movie!

User avatar
moderns-r-us
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 1836
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 6:16 pm
Location: Kansas City

Incredibles Review

Postby moderns-r-us » Mon Nov 08, 2004 11:33 am


modfan
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2091
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 8:28 am
Location: East of Balboa Highlands in Sylmar

There's a an article in today's L A Times

Postby modfan » Mon Nov 08, 2004 1:25 pm


User avatar
SDR
Lotta Living FANatic
Posts: 4783
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Location: San Francisco

Times 'Incredibles'

Postby SDR » Mon Nov 08, 2004 3:54 pm


User avatar
sky
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2224
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2004 3:36 pm
Location: The Bachelor Pad and Ladies Lounge
Contact:

Postby sky » Fri Nov 19, 2004 1:37 pm


JAB
Special Secret Modern Agent
Posts: 545
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2002 7:31 am
Location: Downtown LA / South OC

Postby JAB » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:28 pm

If I could change 1 thing, I would have cast Patrick Warburton
(sp?) (Puddy(sp?) from Seinfield(sp?)) instead of Craig T. Nelson as the lead voice.

User avatar
Futura Girl
Lotta Living Hostess
Lotta Living Hostess
Posts: 4161
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:54 pm
Location: Las VEGAS babay!
Contact:

Postby Futura Girl » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:33 pm


User avatar
SDR
Lotta Living FANatic
Posts: 4783
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Location: San Francisco

Postby SDR » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:53 pm


User avatar
sky
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2224
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2004 3:36 pm
Location: The Bachelor Pad and Ladies Lounge
Contact:

Postby sky » Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:56 pm


modfan
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2091
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 8:28 am
Location: East of Balboa Highlands in Sylmar

I saw

Postby modfan » Sun Nov 21, 2004 6:11 am


modfan
Space Cadet (over 2001 posts)
Posts: 2091
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 8:28 am
Location: East of Balboa Highlands in Sylmar

See the house

Postby modfan » Mon Nov 22, 2004 9:36 am

from a clip on this link

go to clip 3 for The Incredibles

You can stop it to get a good look at the house.

User avatar
nichols
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 9337
Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2002 1:16 pm
Location: The wooded highlands of Altadena, Calif.

Postby nichols » Tue Feb 08, 2005 4:25 pm

Meet the Oscar(R) nominated creator of THE INCREDIBLES, Brad Bird.



Brad will be signing copies of "The Art of The Incredibles" book for legions of INCREDIBLES fans and the first 250 fans will also receive a copy of the Oscar(R) nominated screenplay from THE INCREDIBLES.



BRAD BIRD (Director/Screenwriter/Voice of Edna Mode) has long been regarded by his peers in the animation community as one of the most innovative, talented and passionate purveyors of his craft.  He makes his Pixar debut with THE INCREDIBLES following a distinguished career in television and film.



Bird's credits include a stint as executive consultant to thehit animated television series, "King of the Hill" and "The Simpsons."  For the latter, he directed several memorableepisodes, including "Krusty Gets Busted" and "Like Father, Like Clown."  He is also the creator (writer, director, andco-producer) of the "Family Dog" episode of Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories."  In addition, Bird co-wrote the screenplay for the live-action feature "*batteries not included."  Forthe big screen, Bird made an auspicious directing debut with the acclaimed 1999 animated feature, "The Iron Giant."  Healso co-wrote the screenplay for that film, which was one of the best reviewed films of the year.



THE INCREDIBLES is nominated for four Academy Awards this year:  Best Animated Feature, Best Original Screenplay, Sound Editing and Sound Mixing.



The signing will take place 7.30pm Wednesday, February 9 at Barnes and Noble, The Grove at Farmers Market, 189 Grove Drive Suite K 30, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

User avatar
bananabobs
Modern Master
Posts: 232
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2002 4:47 pm
Location: Thousand Oaks

Postby bananabobs » Tue Mar 15, 2005 10:57 pm


User avatar
johnnyapollo
Special Secret Modern Agent
Posts: 632
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 7:28 pm
Location: Atlanta GA
Contact:

Postby johnnyapollo » Wed Mar 16, 2005 3:46 am


User avatar
Joe
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 4624
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:10 am
Location: sunny Eugene, Oregon
Contact:

Postby Joe » Sat Mar 19, 2005 9:30 pm

I finally saw it last night. Pretty cool stuff, the story was Bond-ish and Buffy-ish, which was cool. I liked the built-in shelves in there home. The details were "incredible" ... pun intended ( :

:cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

User avatar
SDR
Lotta Living FANatic
Posts: 4783
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 8:11 pm
Location: San Francisco

Postby SDR » Sat Mar 19, 2005 9:40 pm

Well -- you ARE a Special Secret Modern Agent -- I'm surprised you weren't tapped for the production ! ("Bond. . .Joseph Bond.")

Guess I'll be the last one (as usual) to see it. From the most recent review, I learned that it's Edna's house that is the most spectacular -- and that the director does her voice (?).

Is it a "I want to see it again" movie? SDR

lasvegaslynn
Lotta Living Hostess
Lotta Living Hostess
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 6:24 pm
Location: Sherman Oaks and fabulous Las Vegas

The Incredibles

Postby lasvegaslynn » Sat Mar 19, 2005 11:29 pm

SDR,

It is definitely a multi-viewing movie. My biggest complaint with the bonus material (and as film maker who appreciates all the behind the scenes stuff) is I wanted to see something on the inspiration of the art design of the Incredibles house, the influence of Bond films and the homage to Edith Head.

Perhaps, I missed it (and please let me know because the set we have from Best Buy is defective and we could not make it through all the bonus material (though we did make through all the way up to "Incredibloopers").

Love the film, love the second disc, just wanted it to be less CG oriented and more inspired by oriented.

User avatar
johnnyapollo
Special Secret Modern Agent
Posts: 632
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2004 7:28 pm
Location: Atlanta GA
Contact:

Postby johnnyapollo » Sun Mar 20, 2005 8:53 am


User avatar
Joe
Lotta Living Host
Lotta Living Host
Posts: 4624
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:10 am
Location: sunny Eugene, Oregon
Contact:

Postby Joe » Tue Mar 22, 2005 10:26 am



Return to “Everything Else and the Kitchen Sink”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests